Just an underpowered table saw?

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It's easy to get bogus horsepower ratings. You don't have to lie. Run the tool off a circuit that delevers the rated voltage that can deliver far more amperage than the common circuit. Stall the motor under power and measure the amp draw. Multiply that by the voltage, devide by 746 and you have your BS horsepower rating. By this rating method, I have some 15000 horsepower wire in my garage.
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In hp, they are probably figuring based on output right before your circut trips in a completely open situation. An expalme being that the blade being bogged down and stops moving and there is that instant before the breaker goes and the motor is peaked.
Don
wrote:

moters
circular
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wrote:

In the vac's case, this is still not possible with a 20 amp, 120 volt circuit.
Barry
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Close. They use a 60 amp cicuit. This is what they get just before the smoke excapes.

being
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 16:26:46 -0500, "RKON"
You'd think so, but let's do the math.
6.5 HP is impossible to get from a 120v 15 or 20 amp circuit.
768w = 1 HP
My 6.5 HP vac says 11 amps. 120 x 11 = 1320 watts
1320 / 2 (rounded) = 1.72 HP (under 100% efficiency! <G>)
Barry
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they're not talking about YOUR shop's circuitry- in the test lab they use much bigger circuits....
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 22:12:00 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 17:23:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

I know. <G>
The point is that the rating is not attainable in actual, real world use.
Drag racers get 5000 HP from an engine for 4-6 seconds, then they completely rebuild the engine. Using power tool logic, many typical V8's could be sold as 3,4, or 5000 HP engines. <G>
Go to the rail yard or harbor and see what thousands of horsepower on a continuous and dependable basis looks like.
Barry
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On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 12:53:23 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

yep. a REAL 6 HP motor is as big as a 30 gallon trash can and runs on 3 phase, prolly 440V.... the motors in those "6 HP" shopvacs are about as big as your fist.
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One would wish.
However, the claim is "Peak" HP.
And the mfr can, undoubtedly, demonstrate "instanteous" levels just before stall/failure, that substantiate the claim.
Unclear if this state is reached before a typical residential circuit breaker blows, or not.
It's "staying within the _letter_ of the law, while totally ignoring the *spirit* of the law."

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That's true in the legal system too.
in message wrote:

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My 1 1/2 hp Rockwell shaper has a lot more guts than my 2 hp routers. :-)
Does anyone know about fitting a new Delta stub spindle to my old Rockwell shaper? I've been trying to chase it down. Google hasn't yielded any results and Delta will not respond when I e-mail their site. If I could find a service phone number, I would call them.

call
one
to the

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wrote:

It's *imperative* that you fix it, or replace it. A properly adjusted splitter is essential in the prevention of kickbacks. Do a Google search on splitter and kickback, and you'll see what I mean.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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Ron wrote:

I have the leg kit too. Aluminum top, undersized miter slots, universal motor with direct shaft drive? No blade tilt wheel?
Crappy saw, but not useless. Think hard about building a crosscut sled. I built one with a miter attachment and a finger jointing attachment, and it made a tremendous difference in how much use I can get out of the saw. The miter gauge on this thing was useless, even with an extended fence.

Toldja... :) It took me a *lot* of futzing to get the blade straight with the fence, and at 90 degrees to the table. I vowed to never, ever tilt the blade again.

Fix it. You can probably bend it enough to get it in line. I run without the guard, but I use the splitter whenever possible, which is most of the time. When you cut a piece of case-hardened walnut that starts curling toward the blade on the far side of the cut, you'll see why. ka-POW! Glad I wasn't standing in front of that. (Kickback.) That was the day I decided to futz with my splitter!

Took me a long time to try anything adventuresome myself. I don't have a planer or jointer either, so until I got some hand planes and learned how to use them well enough to do a passable job of getting the wood into shape, I couldn't use S2S hardwood lumber anyway.
I still have a long way to go, but I'm getting excited about how far I've raised the bar now. I did a chess board out of walnut and maple with this saw. Thought it was a ruin, but after I planed it (and planed it, and planed it) it came out a true thing of beauty. Some alignment problems I'll have to address next time I do a glue-up, but they're not *too* far off, and with eyes closed, I can only tell by the changing grain where one square stops and the other begins. It came out *smooth*.
Another thing... Poplar is soft, but pine is a lot softer. No matter what, you *will* have to take that into account when you cut. The tougher the wood, the slower the feed rate needs to be. I can plow through 3/4" pine on this thing, but I have to take my time with anything else. Oak is about the worst I've encountered so far.
Good luck!
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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I
The
with
the
it
Glad
I fixed the alignment problem on the splitter (with a hammer and a Dremel) and re-attached it. I believe this helped also. I then swapped blades with my Freud 60 tooth thin-kerf blade and cut through some 3/4" maple plywood pretty nicely. The biggest problem was keeping the 4' x 4' sheet snug against the guard while cutting of a 12" wide piece,but, got the wife to help for that. This project is for her kitchen ;)
ThankX again all for the suggestions, Ron
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I also use the 50 tooth Freud Combo. If the Tablesaw that you are using is that $199.00 shaft driven one then you will bog down big-time. Same thing happened to me. I now use the same combo blade in a 1 1/2 HP belt-driven contractor's saw and it works great as long as I keep the blade clean.

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This seems silly, but your experience is so far out of line, that it almost sounds like you put the blade in backwards. I don't mean to insult you, but just about any table saw should be able to rip 3/4" poplar with ease. Something is grotesquely wrong. When I was in college, I worked in an unsupervised student union woodshop, where they let you change the blades yourself without any safetly checkout. I put a blade in backwards. It cut but was fitful and difficult and eventually threw the wood at me.
Bob

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Sounds to me like a wrong tool for the job thing. After I bought my Delta contractors saw, I thought I'd like to get some smooth rips and save myself some sanding time. I put the 80 tooth blade from my miter saw on it and proceeded to try to rip some 3/4 oak. What a nightmare - burning edges, the saw bogging down, circuit breaker being tripped. I switched to a 40 tooth combo blade and haven't had a problem since.
HTH, Jo
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Ron wrote:

Are you running the saw off an extension cord? If so, what guage & what distance?
Scott
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3HP
No extension cord was used. However, it is sharing the circuit with an old fridge.

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That can add to the problem. Depending on the age of the fridge, it can be sucking more juice than the saw. FWIW, I had an extra old Fridge, about 10 cu ft. Replaced it with a new 18 cu ft frost free and my electric bill dropped $10 a month.
Point of this: Buy your wife a new fridge and put the electric savings towards a new saw. Win - Win ! Ed
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