Jointing with Hand Planes

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A while back I posted a couple of questions on using hand planes in lieu of a jointer to joint some large boards. I was faced with the need to joint up some 8' long pieces on a 44" bed length 6" jointer. I was considering moving up to an 72" bed on an 8" jointer (powematic) but opted to try the hand plane route. I went the way of a LN scrub, #7 jointer and LV 5 1/4 for general use.
I wanted to thank all of the folks that repsonded to my queries and passed on advice. While I won't claim to be an expert In a resonable amount of time I am now able to joint the boards as needed. What has surprised me the most is the relative ease of using the planes over trying to monkey the boards accross the short bed jointer.
Besides a general thank you I also wanted to pass on to anyone else in a similar predicament not to shy away from the hand plane route.
and for Mike in Mystic -- yes the LN planes offered an "ethereal experience"
Cheers Eric (who now needs a bigger tool box -- being hooked on planes, the collection is growing rapidly........)
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I've got this bizarre picture in my head of some techo-neaderthal with a huge slab of lumber clamped in a vice. He's holding a 8" jointer upside down in one hand and running it over the edge of the board like a huge handplane.
Must be too much caffeine, or too little, or something.
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if it was O'Deen, he'd be doing it with one hand....
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As someone who can barely manage to use a hand plane to fix a sticking door, I greatly appreciate your post. It follows another recent post that referenced some sources on how to learn to use a hand plane. I am truly stumped as to how 8' boards can be successfully jointed by anyone but a very experienced ww'er, and all the more so by your story. I AM intrigued. Thanks for taking the time to relate your experience. -- Igor
PS: These days, with the out-of-pocket costs of basic video production so low - from camera to desktop editing to DVD burners - as well as the ease of posting sample clips on-line, I am hopeful that ww video how-to's covering all sorts of basic and adv skills will be coming to market.
On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 21:11:20 -0400, "Sam the Cat"

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The cost of production hardware and software has come down over the years but labour, packaging and distribution still make up the bulk of production costs. Also, you won't find much on the market that's been burned on a home DVD burner.
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I think the best opportunity here is likely non-commercial, and web-based. Packaging and distribution costs are modest to non-existant, and most of the potential 'producers' are the same sorts of folks that put up the marvelous web sites we see today. And most of them do it for the joy of sharing their craft, and seeing skills passed on to others.
However, don't understimate the costs of even modest video editing gear. While I have a very well-equipped shop, with very few missing capital power tools, I believe that my sons' video editing setups likely cost easily as much. And the video investment depreciates much more rapidly than a 3hp cabinet saw. If there were not a commercial aspect to it, it would be a VERY expensive hobby.
Patriarch
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 15:23:34 GMT, patriarch

Exactly.
Well, for home-made stuff, video software (to be run on a mid-level Pentium4 machine) can be had for <$100. The software will let you take clips, cut them, and then stitch each segment together. All with sound. And, even with background music!!! OTOH, I am sure your son's stuff is on the sophisticated side. Maybe a Binford?
BTW, while you are certainly correct about the *market value* depreciation of software, if it still does the job then it works for me. I use vintage 1995 CAD software for design and generation of patent drawings and 1995 PIM software for my address book, journal, and data organization, and they work (and are the most stable stuff I have) even on XP machines. (Both companies went out of business, so updates ain't available.) -- Igor
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<snip>

Multiple multi-processor Macs, multiple monitors each. Cameras, recorders, mikes, lights, hardware stands, lots of software, etc. And also many of the same tools running in the Windows environment, with associated hardware, etc.
So, yes. A Binford. But they are doing commercial work...
Start up costs are really in the becoming proficient process - the learning curve. Making video look like it was shot by someone who didn't start yesterday is not a simple process.
But then, designing a custom display cabinet isn't either.
Patriarch, who's a little bit proud of our boys...
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Most free or low cost web hosts will not support streaming video. I think you're getting into serious money when you pay to have that support, which has nothing to do with production costs.
Bob
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lots of time and some website skills. Look at woodshopdemos.com. Packaging and distribution can be done easily, IMO. Of course, "easily" is essentially a relative term. The remaining issue is (and will be) time. All I'm saying is that for someone inclined to spend the time, the options are there at very little out-of-pocket expense. Like the person here who until recently sold a shim for a biscuit joiner. And with broadband connections and easy setup credit card-taking options such as Yahoo Stores, I think that home-made video how-to's can become a good cottage industry. And, some might like to offer it for free on-line, especially as bandwidth costs drop. Think about the people here who, when asked, or just on their own, take and post photos of their jigs, for example. I can certainly see someone here posting a short video showing how they sharpen their chisels. Anyway, IMO. -- Igor
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I agree with you that the cost of consumer level and even prosumer level production costs are relatively low, but the OP mentioned he was hopeful these videos were "coming to market" by which I assumed he meant a commercial product.
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I found that edge jointing with a long hand plane (#8C in my case) is surprisingly easy. However, face jointing is much trickier, i.m.e. In either case, you need a sharp iron and you need to read the grain.

Many already exist. Search (the web) and ye shall find.
Cheers, Mike
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I was nervous as well Igor, especially since the #7 I bought from LieNeilson cost as much as my 13" lunchbox planer from delta!
If you want to get started there are a couple pieces of advice I'd pass on from my _month_ of experience ;) If you do not have someone readily available to show you the way then buy yourself a _nice_ plane. Get a LN or a LV, both work like a dream right out of the box. This will give you a sense of how it should work, then if you want to go the refurb route you'll know when you got it right. The next thing to note is how fine a cut the plane can make (this took me a while to figure out) You will make piles of little curlies and think you are wasting wood away, until you put one of those curlies in calipers -- on average I hit 0.005". Once I realized this I went back to the catalogs and found the scrub plane -- best investment. Only used for removing a lot of wood, this light weight beast can get you in the ball park of flat before the jointer takes over. I usually use three planes, the scrub, then a 5.25 followed by the 7 jointer. Each one is heavier and longer than the last and thus takes more energy to use. Using the scrub to get in the ball park really helps. I relate this to using 80 to 100 grit sandpaper to "get it right" then the higher grits to smooth things out.
One last bit is to make sure you lube the sole of the plane -- I was using paste wax but was recently guided to using harder wax. The difference is night and day -- the first time I used a waxed 7 (after using unwaxed since I bought it) I almost threw is across the room as it just flew across the board with a lot less effort -- really reduces the work load.....
Cheers
wrote:

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Interesting. I've been using soft paste wax and my planes have yet to fly. What brand of harder wax are you using?
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mp An old candle (from Ikea if LMOL remembers correctly) Cheers

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FWIW, I use paraffin (from the canning section of the grocery store) on my plane soles, and my planes levitate. :-)
I just "draw" a couple of "S" shapes on the sole with a hunk of the stuff that I always keep on my bench. It never gets sticky and it takes about a second to renew.
Chuck Vance
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Try using liquid parafin wax, aka "lamp oil". Your plane will fly right out of your hand if you're not careful.
Layne

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Layne <> wrote:

Lamp oil is usually kerosene. The British call kerosene "paraffin" which might be the cause of your confusion.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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He might also mean cheap modern lamp oil that is not kerosene. Comes in many colors, does not smell like hell itself... you know... Alex
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