Jointing problems

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Han wrote:

You could use less glue.
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dadiOH
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Probably ...
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Han
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On 12/11/2012 11:52 AM, Han wrote:

I had a small 6" jointer that I bought in 83. It was used so seldom I think I sharpened the knives 1 time. Considering it's capacity it was easier to cut a straight edge with the TS fence for short stock and I later built a sled for 8 footers. Now the track saw.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 20:33:37 +0000, Han wrote:

If you can get that down to a fat 64th, you've done it just right - compressing that gap with clamps puts enough pressure on the ends to ensure that they won't separate over time.
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Han wrote:

How little is the joiner?
It sounds like the outfeed table is a touch low...while you have pressure on the board on the infeed, the board end isn't getting cut...later, when you have pressure on the outfeed side of the board, the center is being cut.
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Good thought!
Thanks!
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On 12/10/2012 2:33 PM, Han wrote:

As another asked (and I've not seen answered) how little is "little"? A 4" benchtop w/ only 14-16" tables could be a trick, perhaps, but a full-size jointer, even if only 4" should be able to do 42" w/o too much trouble and certainly a 6".
Not knowing the model, here's a link to the Delta sheet for one of the 6" guys that describes how the adjustments are done...
Another suggested the outfeed table is low--that really isn't the symptom for that; generally there you'd see a gouge at the tail end of the cut as it drops of the table is low as the end of the piece comes off the infeed table.
If the outfeed is high, it will cause a curved workpiece but the work will be slightly convex, not concave because as Fig 18 shows in the link the edge will ride on the front lip of the outfeed table initially as the work is held down on the infeed. But, if the pressure is shifted to the outfeed only, then if it is high, less will be taken from the trailing edge.
The other possible problem is that the table sags...
<http://servicenet.deltamachinery.com/Products/GetDocument?docName=En418-03-651-0001.pdf&productIdq513 & productType=undefined&documentId8554& translatedFileName=http://documents.dewalt.com/documents/English /Instruction%20Manual/Delta/En418-03-651-0001.pdf>
Likely it's a combination of perhaps of technique and alignment. How near straight an edge did you have to start with? Did you try to take any initial curvature out by working either both ends from the middle if it were concave or just hit the middle a couple of times if convex? If it's long and had a bow to begin with, you may have just followed the initial shape and simply lessened it just a little...
I've done (w/ effort) pieces as long a 6-ft on a little 6" Craftsman successfully so one _can_ stretch the limits w/ care and practice... :)
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Thanks for the extensive comments. Much appreciated!
My jointer is a 6" Delta Shopmaster model JT160. The instructions say nothing about my problem. I am rather sure it's my technique that did this. I have to get the thing in a better place and practice with some disposable wood. OTOH, one of the jigs that Karl (Swingman) mentioned may do the trick too.
The boards were pretty straight-edged to begin with. But the edges were a bit rounded. Perhaps I'll just glue the next set and then sand them down, or the other way around.
At least this is/was a woodworking discussion !!!
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Han
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On 12/11/2012 2:08 PM, Han wrote:

Might not be all your technique ... spend some time being anal about the tables being set up properly. Chances that it was done to a gnat's ass at the factory is slim to none.

The general rule of thumb for the length of board you can practically joint on any particular jointer is 1 1/2 times the combined length of the tables.
IOW, on a well set up jointer with a combined table length of +/- 30", and with proper technique, the average user can practically joint boards in the neighborhood of 45" in length.
This can be increased with practiced technique, but probably not much more than double for all practical purposes, and that will take some practiced experience.
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Then I was at the upper limit, or just a hair above ... I'm going to try one of your jigs as soon as I have the chance.
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Han
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On 12/11/2012 2:08 PM, Han wrote: ...

OK, I wasn't familiar w/ it--that is a benchtop model.
I did some searching and found several reviews and downloaded the manual. About half the reviews said they had trouble w/ the beds either not being coplanar or at least one or the other not flat/straight. That would certainly cause problems; the longer the work, the more evident a problem.
One mentioned his outfeed table sagged and he was able to shim it--it looks to me from the picture on the cover of the manual that there are four mounting screws for the tables--I'd expect one could manage to fix a coplanar problem by judicious diddling thereat--if the tables aren't actually flat, however, there's nothing to be done but have them surface ground or get warranty service to repair the problem (as one review I saw said a local service center did for his).
All in all, I'm sorry to say, it looks like a marginal machine but one would hope one could manage to tune one up...
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I'm going to be busy doing other stuff until the beginning of next week. But I will take a look and see what I can do to tune it up. Or I will just build me a sled.
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Han
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On 12/11/2012 9:44 PM, Han wrote:
...

I don't know what you do in general but if this one ends up not satisfying but you're limited in space, consider scouring around for one of the _old_ Delta|Rockwell/Delta 4" guys...
<http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id 995>
These won't set benchtop but don't take much space and while small are very much capable.
If you really don't need the width for surface jointing wider material you can't go wrong. They come up now and again for a pittance (comparatively to anything of similar quality these days, anyway).
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Thanks! Copied.
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Han
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