Jointing problems

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Trying to get 42" long 6" nominal width boards of nice white oak jointed to glue up for a shelf. Now the boards touch at the ends, but have 1/16" or so gaps in the middle. What did I do wrong with this jointing on my little Delta jointer? Should I try a handplane?
--
Best regards
Han
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It sounds like you infeed table of the jointer is out of adjustment.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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OOPs! make that outfeed table.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 12/10/2012 2:33 PM, Han wrote:

First thing to try:
Providing the machine/tables are setup properly, the infeed and outfeed combined may not long enough for the board length, and possibly your technique.
From your description, it sounds as if you may be inadvertently applying downward pressure over the knives in the middle of the pass ... it doesn't take much to get the symptom you are describing above.
Try another pass: when the leading edge of the board passes to the outfeed table to the point where there is enough room (about a third of half way), smoothly transfer one hand, then the other, so that _both_ are on the outfeed table, and far enough away from the knives so that any downward pressure on the board is transferred to the outfeed table only.
See if that doesn't help ... if it doesn't, then you either have a setup problem, or the length of the boards are just to great for the size of the machine ... however, you can often overcome this with practiced technique.
A plane would work, but may take more technique, so either check the jointer setup, or practice your technique on some scrap until you get the results you're looking for.
--
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I haven't done too many of these operations, but they worked before ...

That's probably it!

Thanks, Karl! I'll try again ...
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Han
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Han wrote:

Me Who Has No Experience says: Your glue-up would go better if it were 1/16" (or probably even more) FATTER in the middle--that's supposed to be even better than FLAT. With that in mind, I would hack out wood away from the middle, of course, the same amount on each side. Maybe a final pass through the jointer, smoothing off just 1/32" with your goal in mind. Then see how two of them clamp.
Please let me know how works out! Hopefully, someone will correct me if I'm too far off base. Good luck! And, careful on the "hacking" part! : )
Bill
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Thanks, guys!
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Best regards
Han
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I thought "sprung joints" were supposed to have a slight gap in the middle (1/16" might be too much) and touch at the ends.
-Zz
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Yeah, I corrected that in a previous post. I was thinking of clamping "cauls" (that are fatter in the middle). While I'm at it, "convex" is a nicer word than fatter.
Bill
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On 12/13/2012 8:13 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

a 1/64 is even on the large side. the spring is not that much just enough that when you get shrinkage in the winter (the ends shrink faster) it doesn't split at the ends.
Again it depends on your humidity differentials.
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You have this backwards. You want a "sprung" joint, such that the ends contact before the middle. 1/16" is a bit much for a sprung joint, however; 1/64th-1/32nd would be better. There are opinions on both sides of the sprung-joint story.
scott
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in writes:

Thanks for the encouragement, Scott!
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Han
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On 12/10/2012 3:58 PM, Bill wrote:

But very confusing.. fatter in the middle?????
in my mind a sprung joint is better. especially in the summer, less so in the winter. Wood shrinks faster at the ends.
so having an extra swipe with a hand plane in the center is desirable .
living in the NE it's highly desirable... In Louisiana maybe not.
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tiredofspam wrote:

I explored a little, and evidently I had it backwards (so Han is doing it right)! My bad.

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tiredofspam wrote:

I realize now I mixed up with the concept of "clamping cauls". That's the problem with beginners... %-)

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I tried re-jointing, but I think the beds of the jointer aren't long enough. I started a glue-up as a trial with 3 boards (I need a few inches more later). When the glue has dried, I'll saw along the glueline with my fancy Freud blade to make "jointed" edges, then re-glue the boards. I have another shelf to make and the not yet jointed boards line up better ... I tried to make a better shelf, and muffed it up on the first try. Oh well trial and error hits again.
--
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Han
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On Monday, December 10, 2012 2:16:55 PM UTC-8, Han wrote:
05: > Trying to get 42" long 6" nominal width boards of nice white oak > jointed to glue up for a shelf. Now the boards touch at the ends, but > have 1/16" or so gaps in the middle. What did I do wrong with this > jointing on my little Delta jointer? Should I try a handplane? I tried re-jointing, but I think the beds of the jointer aren't long enough. I started a glue-up as a trial with 3 boards (I need a few inches more later). When the glue has dried, I'll saw along the glueline with my fancy Freud blade to make "jointed" edges, then re-glue the boards. I have another shelf to make and the not yet jointed boards line up better ... I tried to make a better shelf, and muffed it up on the first try. Oh well trial and error hits again. -- Best regards Han email address is invalid
When you joint, get your down pressure onto the outfeed table as soon as possible then pull the bord across the blades with pressure down in the foirst few inches to mid point of outfeed table.
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On 12/10/2012 3:33 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

> Trying to get 42" long 6" nominal width boards of nice white oak > jointed to glue up for a shelf. Now the boards touch at the ends, but > have 1/16" or so gaps in the middle. What did I do wrong with this > jointing on my little Delta jointer? Should I try a handplane? I tried re-jointing, but I think the beds of the jointer aren't long enough. I started a glue-up as a trial with 3 boards (I need a few inches more later). When the glue has dried, I'll saw along the glueline with my fancy Freud blade to make "jointed" edges, then re-glue the boards. I have another shelf to make and the not yet jointed boards line up better ... I tried to make a better shelf, and muffed it up on the first try. Oh well trial and error hits again. -- Best regards Han email address is invalid

possible then pull the bord across the blades with pressure down in the foirst few inches to mid point of outfeed table.

i wonder if a hold down, similar to board buddies, would be a good idea to make this an easier repeatable task.
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On 12/10/2012 4:16 PM, Han wrote:

TS. Clamp the board to the plywood with the edge you want to straighten overhanging the plywood. Run the edge of the plywood against the rip fence.
Now I use my Festool track saw. ;~)
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Leon wrote:

Note of concern about this. In the latest issue of FWW (#231, Feb/2013, p.7): There is a "letter to the editor" indicating that making a "tapered cutoff", as described in an earlier issue (much like you described above), resulted in a the offcut falling into the back of the blade resulting in kickback and many stiches to the person's face. The accident was due to the person not using a riving knife, which would have separated the offcut, but the riving knife wasn't mentioned in the article.
Peronally, I don't think I would have foreseen the accident described above. It reminds me just enough of what you described above, to mention it--especially for the sake of anyone using a TS without a riving knife.
Bill

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