Jointing on a Table Saw

Some days ago there was a discussion about how to joint an edge without a jointer. See this on how-to joint using a table saw ...
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb /
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That's neat, you could use one jig clamped to the fence and do either a 1/16" or a 1/8" cut... nifty! I might make one for the adult ed. class. New knives seem to never show up on the old Oliver.
--
Alex
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I agree about the 1/16". Take a 1/16" cut versus the kerf-width cut off the front side that they indicate. Lower the blade below the table. Clamp the jig in place as they show, then turn on the TS and raise the blade. That will allow 1/16" slice on each pass. FWIW. -- Igor
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Why so complicated? I make a close cut, then do a micro-cut, really just a shaving, with no stress on the blade. "Smooth as a baby's bum".
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 19:09:40 -0500, Guess who wrote:

That assumes you already have one straight edge to run along the fence. This gives you that first straight edge.
- Doug
--

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already jointed straight and flat...
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I don't think this is true because the jig shown has the infeed and outfeed fence faces at different planes - just like on a real planer. I don't think it will be as ultimately accurate as can be acheieved on a properly set up planer with an iron table, but it seems like it could probably do a fair job of straightening edges that are not yet straight.
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Of course it's true. Think about it: if the face that's on the table saw is not straight and flat, the board will inevitably rock at some point or points during its trip past the blade. And thus the "jointed" edge will acquire a twist, because it's not maintaining a constant angle to the blade.
BTW, you mean "just like on a real jointer".
And, just like on a real jointer, you need to have the reference face straight and flat *first* before you try to joint the edge. This is *exactly* the same situation as trying to joint an edge on a jointer without having jointed the face first.

You misspelled "jointer" again.

Only if the reference face is already straight and flat.
If the reference face is twisted, this method will produce a twisted edge, just like you'd get on a jointer if you try to edge-joint twisted stock. Note, also, that cupped or bowed boards inevitably have some twist as well, unless the degree of cup or bow is *identical* on both edges of the board (highly unlikely IMO) and thus are subject to the same problem.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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