Jointing happiness

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I certainly agree ... from the perspective of the desired reference/flatness of 0/180 degrees for the finished panel.
However, with most woodworking tools, like table saws and jointers, the reference angle from which angle measurements are usually made is 90 degrees, not 0 degrees.
In this case, a jointer fence that was supposedly perpendicular (90 degrees) to the jointer table.
The angle cut in an opposing piece, and canceling out any deviation from the desired 90 degree cut using the jointer fence as a reference, can correctly be termed "complementary".
Caution ... this concept can cause threads of enormous length and vitriol! :)
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good advice.... So n the spirit of good clean fun:
your argument is true, but in the cases where the boards are taped together, and hand planed simultaneously, supplementary correctly describes the way the boards face together - both when they are planed, and when they are glued up.
:) shelly
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wrote

Read my first sentence again ...
:)
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Supplementary angles are two angles whose sum is 180 Complementary angles are two angles whose sum is 90
Therefore, the miter angles in a joint which forms a right angle when joined are complementary angles. Those in a joint which forms a straight line when joined are supplementary angles.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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And then, a relatively simple and easier procedure to square up the panel after gluing up.
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Freddie wrote:

While I agreed with much of what you said, the above statement is taking things too far. A handplane with straight blade can prepare stock accurately (although with more likelihood of plane tracks). A a router with straightedge can edge-joint, as can a tablesaw with sled. A planer with a sled can face-joint. Heck, a wide-belt sander does a dandy job of flattening large surfaces.
There are many ways to get where you're going....
Chris
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Chris,
I understand your view points, but can't agree with them. In fact, my first powertool I bought specifically for woodworking was a Jointability (or something like that). A router based 'jointing' system. Yes, it worked - ok. Went to "jointing" on the Unisaw when I got it - it was even better. Oddly enough, still was not happy, bought the Powermatic jointer - and yes, better still. But after learning how to perfect a joint by hand - with a cambered blade - I'll never go back to anything else. Even with your points above, you don't address square. I didn't realize how important accurate stock preparation was (flat, true, AND square) till I started concentrating on it. Accurate layout is crucial to accurate joints. Square is a big deal; my results were dramatic.
I'm not telling Mark this way or that. The only reason I'm expending this effort is that I've been there with him (as outlined above). I've tried all these things - and have been MOST satisfied with handplanes. He's having a trouble with a glue up because he can't get a square component off the jointer. Sure you guys are helping him with a glue up - but what of his other components? Does square only matter with panels? Poo! How well does his M&T joinery work out? Slap some Dominoes in an run it through the wide belt sander? Eh... yes, I suppose that would work.
By the way, I didn't make this up. I learned it. Well known craftsman still do this...
- jbd
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Pretty much the same way you do with a hand plane. Sharp blade, thin cut. If that doesn't work then the table saw with the 40 or 60 tooth usually works fine. Actually, for glue ups like this the table saw works fine as long as there is no tear out. I've glued up pine off my 12 tooth already that was OK without jointing anything (for bench tops and such) and that works fine. The rough surface probably aids the strength of the joint. For something like solid cherry panels, like your going to make, my jointer almost always works fine, even with highly figured wood. I only worry about grain direction if I get tear out, which normally I don't.
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Jack
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Jack Stein wrote:

Thanks to both you and Swingman for your comments. My experience goes back to working with maple -- I had a terrible time with getting maple to joint even going the right direction without tearout. I'm going to try the methods you both recommended. I realize also that in the past several years, I've started taking lighter passes as well, that is probably going to solve the problems I encountered in my early years.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

The longer blade is definately nicer. The #5 1/2 will be better, but a #7 or #8 is better still.
While I could usually glue up right off the jointer, I can tell that there are faint machine marks on the edge. A couple shavings from the edge, and it's as close to perfect as I'm likely to see. If you use a stop rather than dogs, it takes hardly any time at all.
Chris
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If you go looking for a #7 (jointer), the offerings from either Veritas or Lie-Nielsen will be great out of the box. If you can't afford that, then as others have mentioned, go for a vintage Stanely. Check for cracks, especially around the mouth. Also check the sole with a straight edge down the length, with the blade retracted. You probably won't find one that's completely flat, but do avoid the ones that have a lot of day light showing--espeically if the daylight is showing through around the mouth.

I have a similar situation with the stock I've run over a Delta 6" jointer. Mostly what comes off the Delta is pretty good--but I can make it better by running my #7 over the edges.
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