Jointing boards for tabletop

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Help. I am currently making an end table. I am working on the top which will (hopefully) be made of the most beautiful maple I have ever seen. The problem is that this is the most figured maple I have ever seen in my life. It is a combination of birdseye and curly maple. I need to edge glue 4 boards to make the table top and am having a heck of a time jointing the boards on my Jet jointer. I even removed the knives, lapped the back and sharpened them on my Makita sharpener. I also took the time to put the knives back in using a dial indicator to get them near perfect. Even with all of this, the boards are coming out of the jointer very unacceptable. Even though I am taking a very light cut, I am getting tearout. Any ideas? I don't own a jointing plane (#7 or #8)...would these do any better?
Bill
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WORSS said:

Are you aligning the grain for minimum tearout? What happens if you use a cabinet scraper (Sandvik makes a $6.00 card) on the wood after jointing? Just curious.
Greg G.
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How is the square edge maintained using the scraper? <Greg G.> wrote in message

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Joe said:

No mention has been made of the thickness of the boards, but a makeshift guide/jig can be used to hold the card edge parallel to the edge. A card scraper doesn't have to have a bent to the blade - just put a fresh edge on the card. I don't know if this will solve the OP's problem, but it's an idea. Wiping the wood down with water or alcohol before jointing may help as well.
Greg G.
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I have tried running the boards through in both directions. There was very little difference between the two directions.....it is really hard to tell what direction this grain is going!.
I was using a smoothing plane on the face (not edge) of the drawer front. It was very tough going but I was able to remove any problems on the surface with a scraper and it worked just fine. However, there is no way to use a scraper on the edge...as the previous poster mentioned.
Thanks, Bill
<Greg G.> wrote in message

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One other trick, that sometimes works, is to moisten/spray the jointed edge with water before running it though.
Doesn't always work, but sometimes saves the day.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/23/03
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You got it. Try the mist of water and try a light pass . Also try to reverse the board direction.You could also just rip the board and try the joint out. Or use a sanding disk in the tablesaw and take a LIGHT pass.

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I know that you said that you are taking only a light cut, but to be sure zero out the knives and then back off just a little.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 22:36:26 GMT, "WORSS"

Put the *other* end of the board through the jointer. One way is always better than the other. (Easier to show than to describe.) Taking a light cut as you did helps too. Inspect the blades under sunlight and magnification.
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wrote:

Bill, I encountered the same problem with a bed that I made recently. The most beautiful curly-stripped-quilted flamed maple ever. My jointer kept tearing out. First when I re-sawed the boards they curled up like water skies. I just about lost it, thinking that the project was doomed and knowing what the wife had paid for the lumber. I called my good friend Dave Sochar at Acorn Woodworks and told him of my problem. He recommended that I use a router and a 1/2" solid carbide spiral up cut bit. Then I was able to "joint" the edges smooth for the glue up and using biscuits and alternating the boards. This assisted with the bowing and pulled the boards into place, hours later I had the flat panels for the headboard. Working most figured woods is a challange, but rewarding. Try your router for the edges. Good Luck, Mike from American Sycamore www.americansycamoreretreat.com
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Mike at American Sycamore wrote:

I shivered when I read that.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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You don't say how thick it is, but maybe try a router? An end table sound like it should be small.
I don't know if it will help or make it worse, but it should do one or the other....
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Toller wrote:

That was going to be my suggestion; a router with a spiral cutter and a straight guide should do the trick, if the boards aren't more than a couple inches thick. Otherwise a jointing jig for the tablesaw might be in order.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 22:36:26 GMT, "WORSS"

Howdy,
Overall, I would say "yes." It might be worth trying to borrow a jointing plane...
HTH,
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Kenneth

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After you joint them; run them through a well adjusted table saw (WW II or equal blade) and you will be able to edge glue without problems. Just take enough off with the table saw to get rid of the tear out.
--
Alan Bierbaum

Web Site: http://www.calanb.com
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Why eve joint the edge Cut them on the table saw alternate the boards face up and face down

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He needs to joint one edge to be straight and square to the faces to reference off the table saw fence, in order to cut the other edge parallel.
-- Brian www.wood-workers.com/users/lavoie

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Don't need the jointer use the table saw to get a straight edge, I go thru abot 2 to 3000 Bd feet of Lumber a year and do not have a jointer

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On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 22:45:00 -0700, "George M. Kazaka"

before I had a jointer that's how I did it. now I have a jointer and that's what I use. much better...     Bridger
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote in message wrote:

I find with my WWII the edge to be better than hand planing if I have reversing grain on the piece I am planing (purpleheart currently). I would think once you flatten the face with your hand plane and then run the board through the TS you're good to go. Did you use some short of those metal jointer clamps or make up a jig on your own?
Alan
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