Jointer vs Table saw cut quality

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Bridger:

Nope, never even seen one but I share your curiosity. Typically when I do see one for sale it's always priced about the same, $200ish. The real down side as I see it though is getting/finding replacement cutters.
Seems like they get a bad rap all the time though.
UA100
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I think it all depends on the quality of the equipment and the user technique. So far I have never been able to get my jointer to leave a shiny reflective surface on the edge of a board. I see this regularly with my TS. And yes, this is along the ripped edge.
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Leon said,

If you are unable to get your jointer to improve the edge and the edge is as Leon describes, why bother. However, my point is, when the situation, wood condition and other factors leave the edge unsutiable after ripping, a jointer will solve the problem.
Dave
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Nope.

difference
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I have been cutting glueable edges with my table saw for years. Mainly because, until now, I have not had a decent jointer. It takes a good blade and a deliberate, smooth feed through the blade. Quite often, I ended up making more than one pass to get a good edge. Occasionally I ended up sweeping a lot of the "glueable edge" off the floor before I got there.
Tomorrow morning I'll finish setting up my new Powermatic 54A. It should be better than the 50 year old Craftsman 4" it replaced.
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I'm sure you will enjoy the 54A. It is a very good machine and like any other essential tool, once you have one, you can not imagine how you managed before!
Dave

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"TeamCasa" wrote in message

managed
Agreed ... often wonder how/why I did without my 54A. Milling rough stock is just a fraction of its duty.
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TeamCasa did say:

Setup?? Procedures?? Sharpness?? BAH!!! The tool with the most power is the best option. Always. HP beats sharpness any day of the week. Maximum current draw = maximum woodworking happiness.
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New project = new tool. Hard and fast rule.


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Horsepower. Yesssssssss.
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 21:21:53 -0400, WoodMangler

hmm... I have an old sears benchtop saw.... and an old chevy 327 in the shed... would about 400 horse power be enough?
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mac davis did say:

Almost certainly. If there's any doubt whatsoever, N2O is always an option.
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That's some 327 mac.
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Time and time again? Nope, don't agree. Many times I get an edge I can't improve upon off the saw. Sometimes not. The "improved" edge I get off the jointer is no better than the really good ones I get off the saw.
bob g.
TeamCasa wrote:

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Even though you may believe that the jointer will win over the table saw, you also say that if all things are quality, the jointer will be the best cut still. Well, I have made cuts with my forest blades both on my CMS and table saw and have been told that the wood I cut was sanded with a 220 grit sandpaper.
After you have purchased a forest blade, you will wonder why you have a jointer other than to put a straight edge on rough lumber that you want to run through your table saw to get two parallel sides that both look like they have has a 220 grit sandpaper on. Suggestion: get yourself s forest blade for your table saw and then ask yourself this question.


again.

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All right. Enough. I almost surrender. As I've said in another thread, I've never seen the need to own a Forrest blade or any other "name" blade. Always found the lesser blade to be sufficient. But... I just keep hearing - well, reading about these named blades, so I have to ask. Just exactly what are you guys seeing when you go to these blades that I'm missing out on? I've gotten great life out of my blades over time, I get cuts that I have considered to be excellent - as I said, I can often glue up right off the saw. Sometimes I do have to hand plane an edge but that seems to be more because I fed the board inconsistently. All things are relative though. Great life, good edges, etc. are all compared to what would result from, oh say... breaking the board over one's knee. My table saw certainly provides a nicer edge than that would. More specifically, what have you guys seen or been impressed with when you went from a blade you were very please with to a Forrest or another named blade?
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 10:03:50 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

In my experience a Freud, better DeWalt, etc... ($50-$60), and a Forrest, Systematic, or other "pro shop" blade ($100+), all start out cutting very nicely. A few hours of cutting later is when the difference becomes apparent. The $50 blade is still cutting OK, the better blade is still sweeeet!
Sometimes, all it takes is one very difficult board to show the difference. Woods that are prone to chip out or burning can magnify the difference.
I actually lived in the same camp as you, until I finally broke down and bought a WWII. FWIW, my local fine woodworking school prefers Systematic and Ridge Carbide blades over Forrest, and he's got them all.
Barry
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Barry responds:

My experience, too, but with Freud 410 blades instead of Forrest.
Anyone looking for SystiMatic blades: I wish you better luck than I had. They seem to have been bought by Simonds and turned into a sawmill brand with replaceable teeth.
Charlie Self "There are two ways of exerting one's strength: one is pushing down, the other is pulling up." Booker T. Washington
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If your saw has excessive run out and or is not set up properly, no blade is going to improve your cut. But if your saw is in good shape and properly "tuned", you will probably see the difference between a top quality blade and a so-so blade. Basically the Forrest stays sharp much longer. This equates to getting better looking cut edges for a longer period of time between sharpenings. In my case, I simply do not see any tooth marks and the surface is as smooth as glass regardless if you are ripping or cross cutting. Naturally there are times that you will see tooth marks but that is usually because the board not perfectly straight or flat. I seldom if ever have to sand cut edges any more and IMHO that alone is worth the extra cost of the Forrest blade.
Snip
as I said, I can often glue up

Often glue up right off the saw? Is there another way. LOL I always glue up right off the saw.
Sometimes I do have to hand plane an edge but that seems

This can happen with any blade and especially if the board is not straight or flat.
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Joe, I do have several Forrest blades and they perform very well. I am after-all an un-repentant tool junkie. I also have other very high quality blades that out perform the Forrest. (Relax everyone, the differences are very small and not worth describing in this thread.)
My point was, not whether a table saw could in some cases, produce an edge that was as good as a jointer, but that time and time again, a jointer will consistantly produce a better quality surface.
For glue-ups, the table saw can produce in most cases, produce a sutiable edge. What about the wood that decides not to cooperate?
Dave

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wrote:

My uneducated guess would be that if you could get that good of a square edge on a good table saw, the guys that do quality work all have jointers that they're wasting time with...
Every web page that I've looked at relating to this and related groups, there is both a saw and jointer... (and a surface planer *sigh* *envy attack*)
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