Jointer vs Table saw cut quality

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In a separate thread, a discussion has evolved to discussing the difference between the quality of a surface prepared by a jointer and that of a rip from a tablesaw.
I believe that if all of the equipment is setup properly, all blades are quality ones, sharp and the procedures are sound, a jointer will still render a better quality surface than a tablesaw time and time again.
Thoughts?
Dave
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difference
Yup - though a table saw is potentially capable of turing out a cut perfectly suitable for glue up. Sometimes I get those, and sometimes I reach for my plane.
--

-Mike-
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A better surface for looking at, or a better surface for glue adhesion?
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used properly either tool can produce a surface siutable for glue adhesion as well as a surface with whatever tool marks there are small enough to escape the unaided eye. if you're getting out the magnifying glass all bets are off.
a well tuned table saw with a good quality sharp blade is a joy to work with....
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Agreed. Dave
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TeamCasa wrote:

Intuitively, it feels like the jointer should win even in the best conditions for the tablesaw. Each cut of the jointer is done by one blade which is a straight line moving to form a cylinder. You now concatenate very close cylinder surfaces, so the finish should be very smooth.
With the tablesaw, you achieve the cut plane surface by concatenating parallel circular lines -- if you move the wood too fast, it would tend to form grooves (you would have a surface akin to an old vinyl record -- an LP). If you move it slowly, it's better, but it still sounds like the surface should be more irregular than in the other case.
I'm no expert, BTW, but this is what my intuition tells me.
Carlos --
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 18:41:11 -0400, Carlos Moreno

depends on the tooth pattern. a saw blade made for finish cuts has big teeth with fairly long faces. the edge of the faces is a cutting surface which overlaps the cutting surface of the previous tooth.
it's not just cutting at the tips.....
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 14:20:52 -0700, TeamCasa wrote:

I've been using my Searz RAS for glue up ripping red oak. Can't feel any blade marks and can hardly find any with a bright light and a magnifying glass.
--
"It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among
[my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between
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TeamCasa wrote:

In theory yes but I can usually count on some tear out with the jointer whereas the table saw delivers me a glue ready edge without tear out.
UA100
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there are several models of glueline ripsaws in the commercial field the most prevalent being the deihls, these critters achieve a cut line that will rival jointers and have been around for a lot of years but they depend on the feed systems to make them that accurate most people use their fence to joint with and it relies on the opposite edge of the board. there are power feed units for the medium and large shop model table saws but the can't match the length and grip of a feed chain. other major considerations are the rigidity of the blade and mounts, just an observation from a diehl 52 owner
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A Diehl is usally not considered a machine sutiable for small shops. I have used one many times. There is simply no subsitute for HP (The one I used had 18" blade with 20hp!) and a power feeder.
Dave

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wrote:

I think the Freud crosscut blade makes a damn fine cut, and I don't imagine the rip blade is inferior in any way. I would think the answer would depend on how nice a jointer you were using, but after a certain point, I doubt it matters much- they're both excellent.

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Interesting reading...whereas I religiously make a habit of ripping wide and then truing-up on the jointer, it now occurs to me that the little fuzzy surface on the saw-cut may actually provide for a better glue-up than the jointer produced glass surface. Will have to experiment.

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"Tom Kohlman" wrote in message

and
IIRC, most modern glue manufacturers will advise you that a rough surface is of no benefit whatsoever.
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Couple of thoughts:
The jointer, or at least all those I have seen (I wonder if this will be one of those why-didn't-I-think-of-that innovations a few years down the road) has knives that cut perpindicular to the grain, with no shear at all. Depending on the pattern, saw blades can have at least a little shear, which should make for a cleaner cut.
Sawblades are usually carbide, jointer knives usually steel. The steel knives can be sharper at the outset, but will get dull quickly and then not be as clean.
Usually, the saw blade is going right through the wood, possibly flexing slightly and marring the cut. I usually have my jointer set to a depth of 1/64" or less - at that depth, there is never any tearout, and even with old knives I get a very clean edge.

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Alex Feldman wrote:

There's a company, the name of which escapes me, that sells jointer heads that use carbide inserts. The inserts are set so that they cut the wood at an angle to the grain. No, I'm not talking about Grizzly.
-Peter
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On 19 Oct 2004 07:02:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@diamond.boisestate.edu (Alex Feldman) wrote:

spiral cut jointers have been around for a long time. latest thing is indexed tooth cutter heads....
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Bridger:

And don't forget the Uniplane.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item842852358
UA100
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UA100 responds:

Scary tools. I note they don't show the cutterhead in the photos. I hadn't thought of one of these in probably 20 years. OK if used with almost excessive care, but it's easy to understand why Delta quit making them.
Charlie Self "There are two ways of exerting one's strength: one is pushing down, the other is pulling up." Booker T. Washington
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wrote:

I've always wanted a chance to play with one. never even seen one in the wild though. any experience with 'em Keeter?
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