Jointer Trouble

Page 6 of 6  
Hello helpful woodworkers. I seem to be confusing a few posters so I'll try to reclarify the board directions. Before I do, let me state I am not trying to square four sides of a board on a jointer alone. I realized how difficult that was when I first bought the machine and fixed the issue by purchasing a decent planer. Also, I have nothing against gagetry (particularly gauges). I am quite a supporter of guages for setting machines better than fingers or eyes can.
OK, that said, I'd listed sides A (top), B (right), C (bottom), D (left), E (front), F (back). I did not list their relationship to the joiner clearly enough. The board would be fed E (front) from infeed table to outfeed table with A (top of board) facing up. Side B (the right side as looking down the planer tables from infeed to outfeed table) would face the fence and side D (the side of the board opposite the fence) would face me.
On each successive pass over the joiner Side C gets closer and closer to side A on the D side but not on the B side. That is, the board acts as if the fence is angled toward me but the fence is set with a 123 block at 90degrees. Thus in the 2"x4"x4' board demonstration, let's imagine the board is perfectly square with the length (E to F) being 4', the depth of the board (A to C) being 2" and the width of the board (B to D) being 4". For simplicity sake, let's say I take 1" off the board. With my current set up, after I pass the board through the jointer . E to F (lenght of board) is still = 4', B to D (width) is still 4", but Side D is now 1" and Side B = 2".
Someone suggested it might be the blade setting but I wanted to know if it was the blade, tables, table (in or out), or operator. The fence and tables are set to 90 as measured by a 123 block. I do not know that the tables are coplanar to eachother.
Again, sorry if this has frustrated anyone and thank you for your help.
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Wheeewww ... I don't. From your description and IF I follow what you're saying:
What you're describing is what would happen if the knives are higher in relation to the tables on your side (D), and lower on the side closest to the fence (B).
Whether this is due to a table being warped/twisted, either stationary or under use, or the knives just need adjusting is hard to tell.
What happens when you swap D and B against the fence and run it through again, and does it have the effect of canceling out the problem?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Ah, the problem occurs when you're face jointing. A light dawns.
There is possibly an alignment issue. You need to check that 1) your knives are aligned with the outfeed table, and 2) your infeed table is aligned to the outfeed table.
Chris
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SNIP....
If I understand what you're describing, I can see two possible causes.
1. The knives are not even with the outfeed table with the end closest to the operator being higher than the end closest to the fence.
or
2. The infeed and outfeed tables are not parallel to each other. The infeed table being lower on the edge closest to the operator and the higher on the edge closest to the fence.
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How is the jointer mounted to the bench? I have a Crapsmen as well and had the same problems you are haveing, the only thing that would come out the other end was a broom stick and a poor one at that. A friend of mine who was a retired machinest suggested that I remove the mounting bolts from the outfeed table, which I did and that solved the problem. According to my friend the bolts were putting a twisting stress on the jointer, and that it reared its ugly head only when in use. He stated jointers, lathes etc. should have only a 3 point mounting system as it is self leveling and that the 3 single mounting point should only be snug only. I have not had any problems since and get 90 degree surfaces.
Joe

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wrote:

Any chance you can restate this a bit?
I understand the concept of three points defining a plane, but not exactly what you're describing in reference to the jointer's outfeed table. Were you just removing one bolt? I should note here that I don't own a jointer yet, so that may be the problem with my understanding your description.
Sounds like a promising bit of information to file away for later use, I just can't quite visualize what you're describing.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
<snipped>

If I understand the problem correctly it sounds like your knives are not parallel to the tables. This article shows one way to check the knives setting:
http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/knife_adjustment.shtml

If you can't raise the infeed table to the same height as the outfeed table lower the outfeed table to the level of the infeed and reset the pointer to "0" after the knives are set.
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