Jointer Safety Help

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Sounds extreme. Also puts him at the mercy of a downsloping off-feed table. Generally, as soon as there's more than a couple of handwidths on the outfeed, transfer there, "walking" the board so you keep things pretty well referenced to the same spot on the table. Control with the right, don't press.
Stand to the side, toward the rear. Light cuts minimize possibility of kickback, and, as I tell the kids at school, if it wants to go, LIFT YOUR HANDS AND LET IT! Never seen kick except when surfacing.
BTW, if you ever want to see something scary, look at a leftie trying to figure out how to feed!

outfeed
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wrote:

Right. Also, I teach my students to keep a couple fingers, or part of the hand over the top of the fence, so if a board does "leave", their weight, or pressure, will be caught by the fence, without the need to react.
--
Jim in NC



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Good advice. I'd add this:
Do think about what kinds of injuries each tool could inflict, and how you should react to each. Talk this over with anyone else in your household. You and they should know:
- what to do for a severed bodypart - how to get to the nearest hospital - which hospital to go to for which kinds of injuries - how and when to call 911 - where the main power cutoff switch in the shop is located - where to find a fire extinguisher - how to use pressure to stop bleeding - etc.
For example, your town may have several hospitals, and one may have an emergency eye care facility, while another specializes in trauma and a third has a really good hand specialist. It's important to discuss this stuff ahead of time because that training will kick in if something ever does happen that requires quick and correct action.
Then, be vigilant to ensure that you never need to use those emergency plans.
Personally, I also avoid using dangerous machines when I'm the only one in the house. It's not inconvenient, as I usually have plenty of other work that involves nothing more hazardous than sandpaper or shellac.
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Mark, while my post does not offer you a specific technique, I thought it would be appropriate to direct you to my recently posted paper on safety. As a Hobbyist Woodworker and a full time Risk Management Consultant for the past 15 years, the words I share with you are directed toward an attitude and mindset toward safety rather than a specific technique.
Good luck with the new tools, and when the hair on the back of your neck stands up like a frightened cat, STOP! Step back and think about your next move very carefully. http://www.woodworkinghobby.com/html/safety.html
--
Dennis Slabaugh, Hobbyist Woodworker
www.woodworkinghhobby.com
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Mark Jerde wrote:

Wal-Mart has spray paint for 88 cents a can.
Paint everything red.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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What about Hammertite Green or Gray?
On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 18:27:08 -0400, Silvan

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On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 19:49:06 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

Just be aware of what you are doing. No leaning. No distractions. No slippery floors. No drugs. Both feet on clean floor. Keep the safety guard in place. Keep push blocks conveniently nearby. Don't rush. It's not a particularly dangerous machine (it doesn't kick back like a table saw can), but the knives are very sharp with the machine on or off. When it comes time to change the knives, do so carefully.
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...just a simple question. If the machine is capable of 1/64ths of an inch cut and common wisdom is not to exceed 1/8" at a time on a 6" machine, how can you ever get hurt unless the piece is too thin or narrow or short to begin with?
Only time I ever draw blood on the thing is in setting them up (twice now!!!...cleaning the factory grease off before even plugging the damn things in).
wrote:

clashes
too
using
jointer
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Been following the thread with only mild interest. I was really curious to see how anyone ANYONE, as some poster had indicated could happen, could accidentally feed stock the wrong way through a jointer. So far I haven't seen the answer to that.
However, as to how one can hurt oneself taking only one 1/64" cut. While the blades only extend an RCH above the outfeed table there is still relatively a large opening between the infeed and outfeed table that will, should an errant digit enter it, allow you to get quite a manicure.
Say a thin or short board being fed on the trailing edge with the bare hand and too much pressure dipping into that gap.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 21:14:49 -0400, "Mike G"

My own fault. I let someone use one of my machines, and as they were a "time served carpenter", I assumed they knew which way to feed it. Turns out they'd never worked in a workshop before, only ever on-site.
<rant> As an "unqualified" amateur furniture maker looking for work, I'm apparently only fit for minimum-wage labouring jobs. But some 2x4-muncher can pull a stunt like this.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Well, I guess that just proves that where there is a will there is a way.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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inch
No matter how idiot proof a tool is, the world keeps coming up with bigger and better idiots. Someone will run a piece that is too thin, too narrow, or too short to begin with.
I can easily see someone taking a 6" wide cut 1/8" deep off the palm of their hand. Ed
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If you're not careful about it, the jointer will effortlessly remove 1/64 off any misdirected fingers 32 times before you even have time to react.
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My dad can affirm that you can feed a suitably substantial piece of stock the correct direction through a joiner, using the proper pusher, and taking only the merest fraction of wood off, and still turn the tips of your fingers into a fine red mist when the stock decides to jump. There is no safe combination of joiner drum and human finger. The only way to avoid serious injury on a joiner is to keep your fingers as far away (and preferably downstream of the feed direction) as possible from the drum.
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Jay Windley wrote:

Yurg!!
Does anyone use feeders with jointers? (I asked this already but if it was answered my filter ate it.)
-- Mark
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