Jointer Safety Help

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I flexed my credit card & bought a 6" jointer, 14" bandsaw, 16.5" drill press, 650 CFM dust collector & 12.5" planer from a guy getting out of woodworking. (All Jet except the Delta planer.) IMO the "Jet blue" clashes violently with the "Grizzly green" of my table saw & sander but I suppose I'll get used to it. ;-)
I've made a few test cuts with the jointer & it scares me. IDAGS on "jointer safety" but so far all the hits are pretty generic. "Don't cut too deep, no nails or loose knots, no hands over the cutter unless you're using push blocks, ..." Are there some good sites for learning to use the jointer and still be able to do10-finger typing for the rest of my life?
Thanks.
-- Mark
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Don't know of any, but as an alternative, any woodworking classes in your area? Most have a safety course along with the basic woodworking.
If your credit card has not melted into a puddle, if you were to buy something at a good woodworking store, someone there may take a few minutes with you at a slow time. Ed
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Only one dangerous part - so keep your fingers away. Now as to how to get work done while avoiding, any basic woodworking text should cover it. Make sure you have push blocks for surfacing, and a push board for edging the small stuff, and that's about it.
Only thing scarier is the shaper.

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George wrote:

George, What's a push board? (going on the assumption there are no stupid questions)
jw
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A board held vertically with a "heel" extending down say 1/4". I like one with two obvious handholds, which helps control the piece. Imagine a plane with a hook at the trailing end to push the board, and you've got a good idea. Fierer and other standard texts should have them illustrated. For the really narrow stuff, pitch it a bit to the left so you can exert down and fence-hugging pressure.

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George wrote:
snip

Ever seen a 24 or 36 inch disk sander with 60 grit on it?
charlie b
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If it's real small edge it with a handplane. Safer and does a better job. To do very small parts clamp the lane in the vise bottom up, or hold it in your lap with one hand and draw the work accross it with the other hand.
However, back to the jointer. One other concern is kick-back. I've never seen kickback from a jointer but it can catapult the board back opposite to the direction you are feeding it so don't let anyone you care for stand there and don't put anything you don't want broken there either.
--

FF

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On 18 Oct 2003 17:54:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

Or if you feed it the wrong way (!) it'll snatch it right out of your hands. My jointer now has a big "<-- Feed" marking on it.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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(Fred the Red

Uh, yeah. The jointer guards I have seen do not allow feed in the wrong direction. Also, unlike some table saw guards, they do not seem to interfere with the work either. Although I'm a bit doubtful as to the effectiveness of the guards to protect you from the kinds of accidents that happen with jointers.
--

FF

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Europeans use a different kind of guard, Fred. They can feed in the wrong direction.
(Fred the Red

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On 19 Oct 2003 10:28:22 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

We use "bridge" guards here in the UK, and Europe too AFAIK. You see some US-style sprung guards around, but I think they've been unsaleable on new kit since the '98 regs came in.
Here's a useful HSE guide (if you're in the UK, you should read this site - lots of good stuff) http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis17.pdf http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/woodindx.htm
Although this is a pathertic little benchtop jointer, it's the same guard as on my 6" http://www.axminster.co.uk/default.asp?part J
There's a curved aluminium extrusion that slides sideways through the end of a rise-and-fall arm. For jointing, you slide the aluminium sideways. For wide planing, you lift the arm up and pass the stock under it. It has the disadvantage that the guard doesn't spriong back when you remove the stock, leaving an unguarded cutter, but on the whole I prefer them.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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This looks pretty interesting. I might buy one myself.
http://www.woodsafe.com /
Bob

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Here's a basic link:
http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/woodwork/planer.html
I think a set of rubber backed push blocks are essential with a jointer. If you don't have a pair, get some.
Bob

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On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 20:48:46 GMT, "Bob Davis"

I'd say a set of three. Two little one-handed ones for working long stuff, and a long two-handed one (like a rubber-soled jointer plane) for passing short pieces through.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Let me refine my question a little. Are there some sites where folks talk about safety and effectiveness with the jointer? Like the best ways to how to deal with cups, twists & bows. (I know, cups down.) Kind of "Jointer Best Practices" stuff.
Thanks.
-- Mark
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Actually, throw in don't try to joint a too short board and what you have pretty well covers the whole deal.
Use push blocks (the long broad kind with the rubber on the bottom) and you really really have to work at it to hurt yourself.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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My Grizzly catalog has three pages of power feeders. The only one I see that mentions jointers is the "Copy Power Feeder." Does anyone use power feeders with jointers, or is this an oil & water combination?
Thanks.
-- Mark
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I don't have any site to recommend, but I'd like to offer up what I think is one of the most important tips.
Many folks appear to push the wood down against the table & fence *really hard.* The problem with this is that they have so much body weight leaning against the jointer that if something goes wrong and the piece is kicked out or their hand (or pushblock) slips, they have no where to go but fall onto the jointer.
It really only takes a light, but firm pressure to keep the board in proper position to flatten or square an edge. If something should happen, then there's much more likelyhood you'll maintain your balance and not end up lunging forward - thereby keeping any injury to a minimum.
Have respect for the jointer or any tool; visualize what the proceedure is for each cut; plan ahead to make sure you have ample room to maneuver the piece going into the cutter and out of the cutter; and finally take your time - rushing through a final step at the end of a session leads to more errors and injury than probably anything an inexperienced woodworker may do to himself. IOW, complacency and impatience are the real demons of a working safely.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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Fly-by-Night CC wrote:

When joining the edge of a 2x4", when do you move your hands to the outfeed table? The guy I bought the jointer from moved his about 18" in front of the cutter & pulled the rest of the way. Given there are two operative parts of the word "kickback," namely "kick" and "back," the "back" part wants me to never have my hands in front of the cutter but my supply of infinite long stock is gone. ;-)
-- Mark
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When jointing *anything* I move my left hand to the outfeed table as soon as there's one push-block-length of wood on the table. As soon as there are two push-block-lengths of wood on the table, my right hand joins it.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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