jointer question

I'm very new to woodworking. I've been scrolling for a little over a year. I know what a planer does and how to use it, but I've never really known what a "jointer" did. I thought it was something like a biscuit cutter or something. Last nite I was reading a book and the writer was describing that you needed to run your wood through a planer (know what that is) then a jointer to make snug joins. Well, I had an epiphany!! A jointer does the same thing that a planer does, except it does it on the edges rather than the face.
Well, I thought that I could use something like that, cause let's face it, scrolling a long straight line leaves something to be desired. I usually try to straighten out the edges on my belt sander, but that doesn't work too well, especially if the piece is too long to use the disk side.
OK, here's the question, thanks for your patience. If I am scrolling the sides of a box, let's say, and I want to run the finished pieces through a jointer, will I be successful if neither edge is "machined". Geez, I'm not sure I'm making sense. Anyway, I cut out the top and the bottom edge of a box. They both turn out to be sorta wavy, if I put them through a jointer, will that work?
Yeow, anyway, please send me an answer to snipped-for-privacy@iup.edu removing the nospam first.
Any help will be appreciated.
TIA
Blake
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removing the

Nah, that's a PITA to do. Read it here. Ed
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Main Entry: 1par·al·lel Pronunciation: 'par-&-"lel, -l&l Function: adjective Etymology: Latin parallelus, from Greek parallElos, from para beside + allElOn of one another, from allos... allos one... another, from allos other -- more at ELSE Date: 1549 1 a : extending in the same direction, everywhere equidistant, and not meeting <parallel rows of trees>
Now what part parallel doesn't a planer do?
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rather than reinvent the wheel, do a Google on this beaten to death subject, CW. A planer is not going to guarantee parallel surfaces. I'm too lazy to explain to you why.
dave
CW wrote:

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If you don' think so, you better look up the definition of parallel.

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Damn, I wish I had a dicshurery like urs.
But know that we know what parallel means, we can easily figure out how a planer will not easily make a parallel surface when you start out with a warped board.
Thanks for the tip. It is truly appreciated. Ed
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It would be hard not to. I never did say anything about flat, though.

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pixelated:

Hey, Clinton's allowed to be right occasionally. That warped board will be parallel between the faces. What you meant is that it may not be -flat-.
Turn in your slide rule, son.
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Don't run the box across the jointer, as it's meant to run with the grain only, and likewise for the planer. You may have more excitement than you're willing to absorb..Tom Blake wrote:>OK, here's the question, thanks for your patience. If I am scrolling the

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Steps for truing stock.
Absolutely necessary. A flat face to work from.
Joint (make flat and straight) one face (reference face) so you have something to true (reference) the remaining three sides to. Not to be done on a planer because the feed rollers will push out any warp and it will reappear as the stock exits the planer. For the same reason use very little down force when jointing.
Joint one edge with the reference face against the jointers fence. This will give you a straight edge that is at 90 degrees to the reference face. Also an edge to reference the next edge.,
Rip a second edge on the table saw with the reference face against the table and the reference edge against the fence. Try to do it on the jointer and it will give you a straight edge but not one necessarily parallel to the first edge.
Now you can plane the piece to a proper thickness with the reference face flat down on the planers feed table. Since the reference face is flat the planer has no warp to press out so the face being planed will be not only be flat but parallel to the reference face.
The jointer performs the two most critical steps in the process (the reference face and edge) but, with sufficient dicking around, there are work arounds. but, without the dicking around, the planer will not perform the functions of a jointer and the jointer will not perform the functions of a planer.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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