jointer pad question


Last night I was trying to put a flat surface on a box end I was making but when I tried to run the wood across my jointer, my push pads kept slipping which made it hard to keep my work against my cutter head.
Anyone have ideas of what I could use to get a sticker grip so I don't loose my grip on the wood I'm trying to joint?
Thanks,
Wes
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I have a couple of sets of push pads.
One has some medium grit sandpaper glued to it, one has a thin foam rubber pad and one set has some very fine pins about 1/16-1/8 inch long.
I also don't normally use a push pad when running material over the jointer.
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do my hands. :-)
--
Lowell Holmes



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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

My uncle shortened a finger this summer using his jointer. My views on push pads changed radically just after that event.
Wes
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Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar Paul dot
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wrote:

Careful...you could go blind....
Lou
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

and splinter may be embedded reducing the grip. And excellent and cheap source of pads for replacement are computer mouse pads. I bought mine from the dollar store and one pad provided enough material for two pushers. Cut two pieces and just glue them onto your current pads.
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Well, you could always use double sided tape OR hotmelt glue to hold a handle/pushstick attached while running the piece thru the jointer
Or, put some peel and stick sandpaper on the contact surface of the push stick so the sandpaper gives it some grab
John
On Sun, 02 Oct 2005 15:50:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

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I typically use gloves with rubber coating. There are lots o' versions. I use the cheapest ones I can get, they are stanley wool gloves with the fingers and palms sorta dipped in rubber. Get em at HD.
There are more expensive version with rubber dots on the fingers and palms.
I use these on jointer and when ripping. Can't beat them in my opinion. I also use a push stick when ripping if it's less than 3" wide rip.
I must admit the jointed does scare me a bit at times but I make sure I have clean technique and never in a position where a slip would put me into the blades..
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Wearing gloves around any machinery is dumb, dumb, dumb. Use push blocks or push sticks instead -- the last thing you need is to get the glove snagged by a spinning tooth or knive, and pull your hand into the cutter.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Wes,
Try cleaning them with rubbing alcohol or even mineral spirits and see if that helps. That's the suggested method for cleaning the rubber rollers on a DeWalt planer and should not hurt the pads. If they still slip, try pulling them across a sheet of sandpaper to scuff the surface a bit.
The there's always the "throw more money at it" route - GRR-Rippers
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pI712&cat=1,41080,51225&ap=1
Bob S.

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maybe you need to work on the other end of the problem -- have you waxed your jointer lately. Force needed to push wood across the blade goes down significantly with a slick jointer bed

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That might be a good idea. I'll get the floor wax out this evening and do that.
Wes
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Imagine a plane with a slight heel. A push block which allows you to maintain all the pressure at the feed end that you need, and can't slip, because the heel has hooked the trailing edge. Both hands holding means none to be jointed....
Great at the table saw too, but always a bit taller as the blades come through the piece.
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Great idea for a table saw, as you noted. Not-so-great idea for a jointer, though, because it necessarily places the feed pressure on the infeed side of the cutterhead. Feed pressure should be on the infeed side only until enough wood has passed the cutterhead to enable a safe grip on the outfeed side; after that, all pressure should be on the outfeed table.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Press with the forward hand. You have two still? Works great.
On pieces much longer than the push, another will take care of the lead, the second the trail.
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I use one plain pad in the front, and something with a hook on it in the back. http://www.wood-worker.com/tips/push-stick.htm
There is nothing special about these; it is just the first site I found on a search.
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