Jointer or Planer

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Jointer. Probably.
You can plane rough lumber with a planer and, if you're lucky enough to start with a straight and flat rough board, or tolerant enough to accept a planed board that is less than perfectly straight and flat, you can get acceptable results. Proper procedures, however, require that you joint (surface plane) your stock before planing (thickness planing).
It really depends on what kind of work you're doing, though, and with what woods.
I recently made up some pine boxes. Started with 1 x 12" #4 Eastern White Pine, sold S3S for board and batten siding. It was relatively cheap at .70/foot, and was about the only 1" kiln dried stock the mill had that hadn't been planed to 3/4" - I like to get a bit heavier than that if I can. Planed the rough side to about 13/16"+. The planing didn't take out the cupping that some boards had, but joining the corners took care of it. And, they weren't too fussy. Had I been doing a different project with different joining methods, using maple or another hardwood, I wouldn't have been happy without jointing first.
That said, you'll still find yourself using some hand methods or shortcuts, because you are probably looking at a maximum of an 8" jointer, and there will be times you'll want to use boards that are at the capacity of your most likely planer size - 12" or 15".
On the other hand, if you see yourself doing mostly rough work using lumber bought unplaned, I'd definitely recommend the planer first.
Eventually, you'll want both.
John Martin
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Sparky wrote:

I'd go with the planer. You can always have the lumber yard surface one face and join one edge until you get your own jointer.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

Same here. Let the dealer provide at leas one straight edge and face, finish it in the shop with the planer and table saw. A good glue line rip blade can create boards ready for edge gluing right off the saw.
That said, a jointer is a very necessary tool to have, too.
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--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

My mistake. Lumber DEALER.
All three of mine have jointers. BIG ones. <G>
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I wish the ones around me did, or even knew what it is... I'm tired of hearing "Huh?? Joint-ner? Whazzat fer?"
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I have never dealt with a lumber yard (not home/building supply center) that didn't have one.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Just one other thing to mention, do you have a good dust collector? Because a planer pretty much requires one, whereas a jointer doesn't, or at least mine doesn't. Or use the planer outside. I have a drum sander which isn't so great at removing a lot of material, but I can either resaw the board or use other means to get it close and then get it flat on the sander.
-Leuf
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Shavings is shavings -- jointers don't produce as much as planers do because they're not used to remove as much wood as planers (usually) are. Coupla light passes through a planer doesn't produce a real big pile of shavings either. I guess what I'm saying is that it's really dependent more on usage than on the tool.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 25 Jul 2007 20:04:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

But on a planer with the cutter on top you can get shavings that sit on top of the board and then get pressed into it by the outfeed roller. With a jointer the shavings are all underneath, and on my Jet just slide down the chute into a box.
-Leuf
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That's a good point; I'd kinda forgotten about that. Guess I've gotten spoiled with the fan-forced chip ejection on my DW735 -- that's a *nice* feature.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Leuf wrote:

can shoot shavings down the driveway and into the street if I don't connect something to it. Only did that once. :-)
--Steve
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I only did it once, too. You came out of it better than I did, though. My shop's in the house, in the basement. :-b
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Sparky wrote:

I'd get the planer. With a sled and some wedges, you can flatten the first face on a planer. Not very efficient use of time, but it does work.
But a jointer cannot, unless there's some magical jig I don't know about, do the work of a planer and make one face parallel to the other.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

jointer next year. Thanks again.
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Sparky wrote:

a Forrest blade WWII gives me a clean enough edge that I haven't use my jointer for several years.It has worked for several table tops.
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Or, if you have an extra $1,800 laying around: http://www.grizzly.com/products/g0633
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Which ever you buy, there will be times you will want the other. If you buy quality material from a good supplier you may not need either very often.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

Having ANY thickness of material available on the spot has nothing to do with the quality of the stock.
A planer makes virtually any thickness of hardwood stock available. For instance: 5/32" blade splitters, 1/4" box dividers, 3/8" sled runners, 1/2" drawer sides. Built up moldings can take on new dimensions by changing the thickness of the layers before edge forming.
Lots of artistic leeway is provided when we can have stock of any thickness we want.
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