Jointer or planer?

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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 04:31:33 GMT, "Leon"

No but plywood edges are not a finished edge nor an edge to be finished.
Mike O
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"Mike O." wrote in message

My experience is that in 35+years of cabinet making I've never found it necessary to use a jointer to "clean up the edges" of any sawcuts I've made when dimensioning stock for a project ... and particularly those made when dimensioning stock for "rails and stiles".
With my always "batch cut" rails and stiles, I prefer that there be no further "dimensioning" of my carefully ripped to width stock, no matter how small, that would result from running them unnecessarily over a jointer.

But, I believe that you should try to keep your fingers out of your mouth in the shop.

Probably due to the fact that my holy grail/focus when cabinet making is "square", not stock free of "hairline kerf marks".

You may suggest, but before I'd take it as gospel I'd prefer to see your qualifications for making the assertion?

To that, I'd say that you need to get out to a few more cabinet shops. ;)

I will take that as stated ... and opinion to which you are certainly entitled, and nothing more. My opinion is that it is not the case.
.. 'nuff said.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
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Agree completely -- if any cleaning up is needed, the first thing to do is check for problems at the table saw, e.g. misalignment, damaged blade, etc.

And any cleanup that might be needed should be done, not with a jointer, but by ganging half a dozen pieces on edge through the *planer*.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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:~) This is mean but I am almost ROTFLMAO. Sorry Mike but while you probably do get the results that you are looking for you may one day learn that you can do way better than that when you learn to set your TS up correctly. The jointer IS NOT a dimensioning tool.
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"Leon" wrote in message

It was meant as a joke ... I inadvertently left off the smiley!!
Sorry bout that, Mike ...
--
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Yeah Mike, I am sorry too, I meant to say that it was mean of me to laugh not what Swingman said was mean, just humorous. I find my fingers in my mouth quite often when using a hammer. :~)
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 16:00:27 GMT, "Leon"

I've set up quite a number of table saws thank you and quite a few joiners. I also know that my joiner knives leave fewer kerf marks than my table saw.:-) If you believe that the results you get with your table saw alone are better than with the use of a joiner, I'll believe you.
Mike O.
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wrote:

That is not an absolute. Unless you maintain "perfect" feed pressure the edge begins going off parallel with the first pass, perhaps not enough that you would consider unacceptable.
I have a good number of quality blades but would never

The Forrest WWII on a well tuned saw will leace a surface that shines and reflects like glass. That's what use.
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Quote :BTW, I've never seen ANY blade (and I've used most brands) that will leave as good an edge as sharp joiner knives or a hand plane will. Unquote"
Before having a 6" heavy jointer, I used a 10 inches, Ripping Hollow Ground-planing blade.
This blade only works when your board is square with the blade, fence and perfectly perpendicular to the table.
To accomplished that I used to secure the board with toggle clamps on a sled and push it between the fence and blade.
Not the ideal solution but it did the work to build three solid wood bedroom sets and dinner room.
Now I make use of top of the line ripping (Freud) blade, heavy jointer and surface planer. This way I can go much faster.
FWIW
wrote:

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Mike O. wrote:

My Powermatic joiner is properly set up with the knife height set with Ed Bennetts TS-Aligner Jr. My blades are sharp, but I still get a scalloped edge that requires much more sanding to clean up than the cut left by my Freud Glue Line Rip blade on my tablesaw. I won't argue that a hand plane leaves a smoother edge than either. I much prefer using the cut edge from the table saw than a jointed edge. I still use my jointer to give me a reference edge to go against the saw fence, but I usually end up ripping that edge away before I'm done.
DonkeyHody "Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." - Will Rogers
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This is oversimplifed but I believe it makes a point:
If you have only a planer, you will WISH you had a jointer.
If you have only a jointer, you will NEED a planer.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Planer. There are many ways of jointing without a jointer but thicknessing is rather difficult without a planer.

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Can you enlighten a noob on some of these jointing methods. I'd assume a hand planer would be one. CW wrote:

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EE Gads, I just scanned down the list and there sure are a lot of opinions as to which machine to buy. I don't know that there is any real consensus of opinion! But one thing for sure.... There are lots of opinions!
Let us know what you summarize from it all and what you decide to purchase!
Don Dando

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Flatten a board with a sled and a planer. The sled essentially compensates for high spots from the bottom of the board so that the board does not flatten out or rock when going under the in feed roller of the planer. Once that surface is flat, flip the board over and run through with out the sled.
To straighten the edge of a board build a long narrow, 14" or so, and 8' long sled with 2 toggle clamps. The clamps should be screwed to the sled for easy adjustment for different width boards. Rip this sled straight on the TS and then clamp the board to be straightened on the blade side of the jig with the curved edge hanging over the edge of the jig. Use the rip fence to guide the sled and adjust it so that the blade side of the sled is at the edge of the blade. Now run the sled and board through and cut the curved board straight. This is actually easier faster and easier than using a jointer.
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Leon wrote:

contact on both sides of the board over the full length. The planer can then flatten both sides and make them parallel as the board is flipped. In the case of some really nice faces, I've not had enough wood to make both sides completely flat, so the unfinished face is oriented to where it won't show.
I've seen woodworkers face joint, face joint, and face joint some more, until one part of the board is less than finished thickness, but the other face hasn't been touched at all.
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be to look at used equipment so you can buy both.
Here are the considerations: 1. A jointer cannot do the job of a thickness planer. Period. 2. With appropriate sleds or jigs, you can face joint with a planer. But it's a lot easier with a jointer. 3. With appropriate sleds or jigs, you can edge joint with a table saw. But it's a lot easier with a jointer. 4. The whole operation (face jointing, edge jointing, and thickness planing) can be done with hand tools. But it's a lot easier with a jointer and a planer.
The two work together: flatten a face with the jointer, then make the opposite face parallel to it with the planer. Best to have both.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Planer.
The design feedom to use other than stadard-thickness components is huge in my book.
Get a hand plane to knock off the high spots before planing.
Then save for the jointer... You will want one.
-Steve

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Planer
I have had a jointer longer than a planer and have seriously considered on several occasions of getting rid of the jointer to make more room. Currently my jointer is more convenient to use than either of my planers or my TS and choose to use it as a last resort. With a very simple jig you can rip straight an edge on a board and with a little more complicated jig plane flat a board on a planer.
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