Jointer or planer?

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Which would you buy first if you could only buy one. Either of these would be in the $400 range not the high end pro models, at least not yet. Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Planer.
Lew
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Any particular reason? Lew Hodgett wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I bought a planer because it's possible to use it as a jointer, and it's possible to use your table saw as a jointer, and it's possible to joint yer wood with a hand plane. There's lots of ways to flatten a board but not many ways to get all your stock to a precise thickness with both surfaces parallel.
But it didn't take me long to really, REALLY want a good 8 inch jointer. I got a lot of use out of the planer alone but it sure is a joy having both. 400 is not a bad price for a planer but I think the kind of jointer you'd get for that will give you more frustration than help. I paid a little over 700 for my Griz G0586. They're about 800 now. In a jointer, length of bed really matters.
If I had it to do over I'd still buy the planer first and force myself to wait till I could afford a longbed jointer, or find one used. Usually in hindsight I'd make changes but in that instance I still think I did it right.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Agreed. You can pick up a decent DeWalt planer for around $400. I went the cheap route with a jointer, and it pretty much sits and gathers (saw)dust. I end up using my radial arm saw for any large jointing, and my router table for any small work.
BTW, Craftsman 6 1/4" jointer for sale. $80 OBO. Lightly used. In Ft. Worth, Texas.
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
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wrote:

Wrong. It is *never* possible to use a planer as a jointer.
The two machines serve completely different functions. The two machines have a kind of symbiotic relationship. A jointer makes one surface of a board flat. The fence on the jointer is used to make one of the edges adjacent to that flat face perpendicular to it. Various adjustments to the tables and fence on a jointer can vary the results from flat and perpendicular.
The reason a planer cannot joint is that the pressure of the feed rollers can temporarily flatten the board so that it gets planed, but the board returns to it's formerly cupped/twisted/warped original shape after that pressure is relieved. Of course, if you're board is "flat enough" or you otherwise use any clever jigs or other contraptions to hold your board as it goes through the planer, you *might* get away with making the surfaces flat and reasonably parallel to each other.
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 3:54am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@removethis.yahoo.com (GeorgeMax) doth burble: Wrong. It is *never* possible to use a planer as a jointer. <snip>
Oh ye of little imagination. I don't have a jointer, and do most of my jointing with my planer.
Simple enough, use a planer sled. They'll work even with crooked wood. I've made two, plan on another. Or, you can make a guide to run stock thru, I may try that for my next project.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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Can you explain this for the woodworking challenged? ;-) J T wrote:

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Thu, Dec 7, 2006, 10:18pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com did plaintively query: Can you explain this for the woodworking challenged?
Thought I had. OK, very basic. The magic 8 ball says, DAGS planer sled.
Mine've got cam alone one edge, from some of my uncompleted cam clamps, so I can take up the space with scrap wood, then clamp everything in place. They're 100% wood and glue, no metal, just in case.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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On Fri, 8 Dec 2006 00:31:35 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Did you read my whole message?
I quote: "or you otherwise use any clever jigs or other contraptions to hold your board as it goes through the planer, you *might* get away with making the surfaces flat and reasonably parallel to each other."
While possible, far too much rigamarole. My shop time is too limited to allow for something that's going to be different for each board. All that setup. That takes too long.
But as my message says, I *might* do it if the situation presents its self and its justifiable (to me).
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 9:16am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com (GeorgeMax) doth query: Did you read my whole message? I quote: "or you otherwise use any clever jigs or other contraptions <snip>
Yep, read it. Except, I consider a planer sled a basic accessory, and not a clever jig, or contraption.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 13:34:17 -0500, J T wrote:

So how long does it take you to adjust your planer sled for each board?

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(George Max) doth

I have an 8' sled and to adjust it for an 8' board it takes about 2 minutes. Then it is good to go for how ever many passes it takes. Shorter boards take proportionally less time. My sled is also good for boards up to about 14". Not many people can afford a jointer to handle boards as wide as their planer. While using a jointer may be a little quicker on smaller boards there is a greater advantage in time on longer and wider boards when using a TS and Planer.
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 22:58:02 +0000, Leon wrote:

What method does it use to support the curvature of the board so that you get flattening?
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There are about 8 or 9 even spaced rocker strips that the board actually sets on and these set on the sled. The rocker strips use triangular wedges that are dadoed in to each end and held in place by the very point of a screw. The triangle wedges slide in to raise the rocker strip or slide out to lower the rocker strip.
I got the plans form FWW IIRC. I can repost plans if you would like to see them.
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 04:11:28 +0000, Leon wrote:

Found it on their site. Thanks.
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Fri, Dec 8, 2006, 10:00pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J.Clarke) doth asketh: So how long does it take you to adjust your planer sled for each board?
Never timed it, but not long. If I'm only doing one piece, then I have to put in some scrap, to take up the space, then use the clamps to hold it all in place. If I'm doing several at the same time, to come out the same, less scrap, same principle. Maybe a minute or less. If you were wedging them in place, I would say a bit longer.
However, if they're rough stock, and I want to take off some off of each edge, then flipping them, and re-tightening the clamps only takes a few seconds. I have to do that reclaiming pallet wood, to get uniform size pieces. Depending on how many pieces I have, I may run a batch thru, taking just a bit off one edge. Then run a new batch thru, not moving the cutters. Once the first batch is shmmed so they'll clamp, it's only a few seconds putting a new bunch in, and adjusting the cutters just a bit. Continue until all are done on one edge. Then adjust the cutters slightlym then repeat, untill all the rough spots are out. This will make all the pieces the same width. It's actually pretty fast. If you don't care if the pieces are the same width, then you can just do several pieces at a time, then more, until done.
I made my sleds at least 6" wide, but you could make one narrow enough to hold just one or two pieces if you wanted.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
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wrote:

FWIW...
I own a really good jointer. I still use a sled similar to Leon's to flatten wide boards that I don't want to rip to 8" before I flatten the face. Like any other woodworking jig, a planer sled is quick and easy, once your mind is in the groove.
Don't use something often? Stay in the groove by keeping a notebook, complete with sketches, and write the really important details right on the jig with a Sharpie.
I'd buy a planer first, and save for a good 6"++ jointer as my next tool.
------------------------------------------------------------------ Repeat after me to use clever jigs and advanced tools:
"I will keep notes, I will keep notes, I will..."
I have distinct notebooks for general notes (jig usage), tool setups, tuning, and maintenance, sharpening, and finishing, (4 books, plus a 5th that sits in my HVLP case) and flip through them before I do something I haven't done in a while. I also keep a rudimentary time log for future estimating, but this is probably unnecessary if you know you'll never, ever charge for a piece.
Above all, have fun. Art, music, and sports always come out better when the participant is having fun.
Barry
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I own a really good jointer. I still use a sled similar to Leon's to flatten wide boards that I don't want to rip to 8" before I flatten the face. Like any other woodworking jig, a planer sled is quick and easy, once your mind is in the groove.
Do you have some detailed sketches of the your sled I would like to build one. TIA

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Sorry, I don't.
Leon posted a full description a few messages back.
My original version was a simple MDF sled with framing shims (usually found near the 2x's in home centers) and carpet tape holding everything in place.
I think I found the drawing for the version I use, which is much faster than shims and tape, in one of the books I've borrowed from the library.
Here's a pay-per-view .pdf of one way to skin the cat: <http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesPDF.aspx?id $118>
If you subscribe to FWW, online access is cheap. Otherwise, I'm sure there might be another version on Google. These things are like router mortise jigs, crosscut sleds, etc... in the respect that they've been around for so long, there's been many variations of them published.
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