jointer knife setting jigs

I new this time would come! The knives on my Yorkcraft 6" jointer are finally dulling out, so I plan to take them to the sharpener. What's the deal with resetting the blades? Is it the nightmare I'm expecting, or not? I was about to order the knife setting jig offered from Grizzly for $26. It appears to simply rest (magnet?) on the outfeed table and give you an exact reference for setting the blades. Is this device worth it?
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I have one of these (Jointer Pal) and certainly find it useful. It may not be able to set your knives to tolerances within 0.002 as some woodies strive for, but that's not really needed in my opinion. It sets my knives accurately enough to be able to straighten out a boar quite nicely. There are other methods like using a straightedge for example, but I find the Jointer Pal to work very well for me.
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Woodcrafter wrote:

Ditto.
I'm usually not big on purchased jigs, as I've found Tage Frid's no-nonsense setup techniques usually work well for me. This jig was worth my $40.
Barry
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If they have jack screws like the YC-8J it is not a nightmare. Just pull up a chair and get comfy in front of the machineIt took me about 20 minutes. The only tool employed was a straightedge, the supplied open-end wrench and the supplied allen wrench.. I used the jack screw to lift the knife so that it would touch and move the straight edge (resting on the outfeed table and overhangling the cutterhead) as little as possible when turing the cutter head. I got it down to where the cutter head advanced the straight edge 1/8". I could not make it less w/o going to zero. It was about a 10-degree turn of the jack screw between 0 and 1/8" advance of the straight edge.
Test cuts were spot on.
The Chinese 6"er that it replaced *was* a nightmare. It had nothing but springs under the knife, and a crude jug to hold the knife a constant height above the cutter head.
-Steve

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Hey, if yours had springs under the knives consider yourself lucky. I just bought a six-inch piece of Asian scrap metal that had neither jack screws nor springs. Try setting the knives in one of those if you want to have some fun. I even found some tiny springs, modified them slightly and tried to fit them under the knives while applied pressure and attempted to tighten the gibs. It didn't work so I finally broke down and went out and found one of those magnetic devices, jointer pal or whatever it is called. With that I finally got them set, more or less. After I locked them I put a gauge on and they were up to four thousandths off. I suppose I could have played around a bit more and reduced that to one or two thousandths but I think four thousandths is adequate unless you are more preoccupied with precision measurement than with getting on with what you are doing.
I have a DJ 20 up north where I live most of the year and I use the Makita wet grinder to sharpen both my 12-inch planer and my 8-inch jointer blades. I didn't bring it with me to Florida and after finally getting the knives set in the Chinese devil I discovered that they really should have been honed while I had them out. Now I'm going to have to hone them in situ, something I've never done before. It makes me wonder if I should get one of those jointer honing devices. Anyone tried one of these things?. Do they really work better than wrapping a piece of waxed paper around a good oil stone and going after them with that?
You know if you are used to working with well-tuned, quality tools and you find yourself forced to work with junk your admiration for those who are capable of doing great work with cheap machinery really goes up a notch or two. But then there are the Neanderthals who disdain all machinery and turn out truly exquisite work. Or, just look at what was done in the 18th C. Today I used my old Stanley (78 I believe) rabbiting plane because I felt I could do better with it than trying to rabbit on the Chinese devil. It was almost as fast and I didn't screw up the piece of teak I was working on as I might have on the jointer. If you are not trying to make a living at it there is really something to be said for the pleasure of using a well-tuned plane.
On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 20:51:33 -0500, "C & S"

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Touche'
You have my sympathies.
-Steve
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position of the cutterhead is the same for each knife.
If you have jackscrew adjustments, don't need magnetic anything except to attach your touch gage to the outfeed.
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"Cow magnets from outfeed to knife. " Would that be sans cow? If not, how do you get the cow to hold still? :) Good idea to use those. I'll bet a couple of those are cheaper than any knife setting jig you could buy.
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