jointer knife adjustment


i have posted a little about some old woodworking equipment i recently inherited.
right now dealing with a early 1960's Craftsman jointer ok, so now i have dismanteled, cleaned and reasembled the motor. also took the jointer apart except for the infeed table and the rotor head (i just didnt see the need since those parts look rather complicated and it appeared to be in fairly good shape)
polished the table beds, used rotary wire brush and naval jelly to remove rust on all other parts, painted and reassembled. this is one handsome little antique jointer now.. ;-) using 2 different high-quality levels, one cast aluminum and one wood with brass trim, and flipping each every which way, i find the two tables to match up perfectly all over - so no warping has occured and the height indicator is "spot on". i have read that these jointers can warp and i am pleased to say this one appears very true.
now i am down to installing new knives, and have read how to do it for this type of jointer with a non-adjusting outfeed table and find there are several variations so i am not sure who to believe. so my question is - once i set a knife and holder in place loosely, and adjust the little hex screws to raise the knife to the level i want (.002" above the outfeed table, i have heard .001 to .003 so i am going to the middle), can i screw the adjustment screws all the way in and count the number of turns (say to the 1/8 turn) it takes to reach bottom, then back out this exact number of turns, and apply this same factor to the other knives to save time and make it easier? seems like it could be just as accurate as going through the arduous process of minute adjustments, but since i have never done it i may be way off the mark......
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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

The short answer is "no"; it's highly unlikely you'll find that to be accurate enough in that the holes probably aren't tapped to that precisely matched depths. It'll get you in the ballpark, but you'll still need to match them.
The easiest final setup imo is to use a dial indicator to make the final setting. Be glad that at least yours does have the adjusting screws.
As for the final height, relative outfeed table; again that is a good target but the answer will be they're the right height when a test cut produces a straight edge regardless of the measurement.
--
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RE: Subject
One of these magnetic setting gages for jointers takes all the guess work out of the job.
Lew
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Amen

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What magnetic setting guage?
I, too, use the (sometimes) tedious fine-tuning of each of the 5 set screws, per blade, technique on my 8" powermatic. I don't really mind doing it, I've become an expert, but there have been times when I wish it would go a little faster.
Thanks. Sonny
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some comments i have read while googling around is that some people think these are worthless.
i found the Delta Jointer-pal and it says this:
"Delta Jointer-PalTM magnetic knife setting jig holds knives to the height of the outfeed table surface (+/- .002") for fast, accurate jointer knife replacement. "
wtf?? if it ends up -.002" then the stock will be hanging up on the outfeed table, no?
i have heard some say it should be 0.00", others .002 to .004. obviously too much will cause a notch in the end of the stock. i am assuming being .002" or allows for the blade to get more cutting time on the material, and the drop is insinificant at the end.
but being under the outfeed table just doesnt seem right.
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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

...
They seem to be like...well, a lot of things... :)
The only time I've tried one it wasn't much of a success but there are others who rave over them. Go figure... :)
--
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I must have had a clone.
Paid less than $20 for what I had and it did the job.
Lew
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plus *or* minus 0.002 ??!?!?
0.004 is a sheet of paper. I can get closer than 0.002 by setting a straight edge across the outfield table and slowly turning the head to hear the knife just barely kiss the straightedge (my prefered method). It takes a little longer but I'm always happy with the results.
having it beneath the outfield table will cause a bow cut as the cut wood rides up onto the lip of the outfeed table.

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That's the way I set mine and can't see any reason to do it differently. It's not like you have to re-set them every day or anything.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Remember adjusting the knives are from the cutting edge not the base.
Meaning - blade A might have had a nick that was ground out and is shorter in total height when compared to the other two.
Normally there is a blade holder that sits above the slot and it registers the cutting edge inside it - and you let the metal hang down and bolt it in.
Then all three are at the same height.
Martin
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FWIW, my 1948ish Homecraft / Delta 4" jointer wants the blades set to 1/16" or .0625" above the cutter head. The out feed should be in the same "plane" as the cutter head.
Mike in Ohio
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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

I use an old horseshoe magnet to hold my knives. I looked for one like mine but couldn't find one. This one is pretty close and looks like it would work.
http://tinyurl.com/y9feano
Hard to beat for $7...
--
Jack
Got Change: 57 States, not including Alaska and Hawaii!
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ok, i finally did it. i used the straight edge method, adjusting the knoves until they pushed the straightedge 4mm, this is supposed to translate to .001-.002" if i recall after you do the trig.
wow, i was amazed - just 1/16 or less of a turn made a travel distance change of 2-3 mm. the first one was a tedious chore but the others were a snap after learning the little tricks that you find.
now i just have to get an electrician to wire 220v for my garage so i can try it out....
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