jointer decision

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Opinions needed on first jointer purchase, I want to build some furniture, china cabinet, build in book cases, possibly a bed,. some night stands, things on that order,
I'm going to look at a JET 708457DXK JJ-6CSDX 6-Inch for $550
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
and also a Craftsman Professional 6 1/8" jointer 1/2" rabbiting capacity with a 46" cast Iron table model # 152.217060 for $300 about 4 years old.
I don't have a link to this. Both are said to be in like new condition.
Is the difference between the Jet and the Craftsman worth the cost difference, I could use the price difference toward the cost of buying a planer next ,so it does matter to my budget. as I am retired now and on fixed income Thanks for any thoughts CC
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I have a 6" Craftsman jointer. There I said it. I have had it for 25 years. I have been doing serious woodworking for 30+ years and decided in the last couple of days that I don't need a jointer. You can probably do with out one also. You should get a planer before you get a jointer and with the right jigs you can flatten and straighten a board with a table saw and a planer, that is what I do.
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Leon wrote:

I agree with Leon that you can get by without a jointer. My delta has been sitting for three years now and have not had a need for one. If the tablesaw is in tune with a good blade, you can do without. A planer is a worthwhile investment.
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jointing? :D I have a 6" Jet and hold the opposite opinion. The boards stick together from the vacuum between their faces when they're stacked next to each other on edge. My hat's off to you and your skills if you can do that reliably without a jointer.
On a fixed income, though, I'll concede the point. You don't need that level of precision for stuff that grows and shrinks with the seasons. Tell me more about your jigs.
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Partly ;~)
I have a 6" Jet and hold the opposite opinion. The boards stick

I have never checked to see if the boards stick from the vvacuum however the joint pretty much disappears when the boards are slid up next to each other. Basically if you can rip a straight line on your TS you can straighten a board on your TS with a jig. Grain is typically the only indicator of where to look for the joint.

I use a piece of 3/4" x 14" x 8' long piece of plywood with a straight edge that runs along the rip fence of the TS. I clamp with two toggle clamps the board to be straightened with the crooked edge hanging off the opposite side of the plywood panel. The clamps hold the crooked board so that the crooked edge is cut off when the jig is run through the TS. This jig woks on the same principal as a taper jig for a TS except the board rides on top of the sled rather than beside the jig. I am using a cabinet saw with a Forrest WWII. I can actually straighten a board much faster than using a jointer with this jig. I only takes one pass to straighten any board up to 8' in length. Can you say that about most any common sized jointer? ;~)
I also have a sled jig for my 15" stationary planer that will flatten boards up to 13" wide. This is impossible with most common sized jointers unless you rip the board in half and flatten the two resulting pieces.
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Yah. AOK on the rip part. Won't you need a bunch of shimming to plane the face on the sled? How does that work if not?
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On Mon, 05 Jan 2009 10:49:29 -0600, MikeWhy wrote:

That's what I was wondering. Every planer flattening jig I've seen had provision for multiple shims/wedges to allow flattening a warped board. Since every board is different, rearranging all the shims for each board gets old quick.
I suppose the sled is an improvement over hand planing the entire face :-).
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In deed it does get old but not that quickly. It did get old when working over 200 bf of oak but really it was the only way to do the deed with the boards all being about 8.5' long and at least 8" wide. 85% of the rough cut lumber was too large for a 8" jointer.
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Yes, the jig featured in Fine Wood Working IIRC, and the one I built and use uses a shallow torsion box style sled with several anchored but adjustable wedge shims. For a wide and 8" long board it takes about 2-4 minutes to properly shim the board, the shims are on both sides of the sled and spaced about 12" apart along the length of the sled.
Typically most of the wood that I purchase is flat enough to let the planer mill with out the sled.
I built my sled when I had 200 bf of bandsaw milled oak ranging in 8"-13" width 8' long, to flatten.
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Leon wrote:

Interesting discussion. I've used jigs similar to what you've described and I agree that a wooddorker can do without a jointer, but I wouldn't *want* to, at least for the smaller jobs that don't test the limits of its capacities. I have the 6" Delta Pro and it's one of my favorite tools in the shop, though I do get jealous whenever I see a picture posted by David Eisan. :-)
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Steve Turner wrote:

Am I the only one who's done jointing on the router table? Should I be embarrassed? :-)
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I've done that afore too, but it's kinda hard to face joint on a router.
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Steve Turner wrote:

tru dat. 'scuse the ignorance, because I'm on the other side of my brain today, but doesn't a planer do that?
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Only if the face opposite the blades is already flat, or can be made to appear flat by affixing it to a sled (as Leon described in another branch of this thread) so the board doesn't shift on the non-flat face as it's passing through the planer.
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Steve Turner wrote:

Right, gotcha. Affix it to something that is long and flat, which will ride the planer's bottom surface. Then flip. Otherwise the knives would just follow the contour of the board's un-flat bottom.
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-MIKE-

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Nothing to be embarrassed about. Hell, Lee Valley sells shims for jointing on the router.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pA801&cat=1,43053,43885,42837
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    No. (at least, I hope not...)     I have very limited space and budget, and do my jointing on the router table too. It took a little practice to get the bit perfectly set to the shimmed outfeed fence (sounds easier than it is), and you have to make sure the fences are perfectly flat and co-planer to start, and the bit is standing exactly 90 from the table surface; but once I got that, no problems. I built my fence somewhat beefy anticipating doing this, and that helps too. The other "trick" I found is to only take a tiny bit off with each pass, ie, use a small shim. 3 or 4 small passes >>>> 1 or 2 big ones. (as is usually true with about anything on the router table).     OTOH, not a single person has looked at my work and said "hey, you used a router table to joint those edges, didn't you!".
    Sean
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Before I had a jointer, and after I became unhappy with the results of the tablesaw I had at the time, I did a lot of bookmatched pieces (soundboards and backs of guitars and dulcimers and such) that way. I forget who made 'em but I found some extra long (1.5") bits just for router jointing.
Ed
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Ed Edelenbos wrote:

<crocodile dundee voice on> That's not extra long. This is extra long. <crocodile dundee voice off>
I have one 3 inches. [insert joke here]
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I'm not touching that one.
Ed
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