Jointer alignment problem


I've got a Sears Contractor jointer (6 years old) which has given me pretty good service over the years.
Lately, however, it has lost alignment and I can't seem to recover it. Run a board over it and the resultant edge is proud in the center. Perfect for cawls but not very useful for gluing up panels. Very symetrical, incidentally.
I've adjusted the blade height several times to no avail. One of the problems is there is an amazing amount of backlash in the outfeed table adjustment so setting it is problematic at best. Anyone have any suggestions as to what I might do differently. New jointer isn't an option right now.
tnx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've got a Sears Contractor jointer (6 years old) which has given me pretty good service over the years.
Lately, however, it has lost alignment and I can't seem to recover it. Run a board over it and the resultant edge is proud in the center. Perfect for cawls but not very useful for gluing up panels. Very symetrical, incidentally.
I've adjusted the blade height several times to no avail. One of the problems is there is an amazing amount of backlash in the outfeed table adjustment so setting it is problematic at best. Anyone have any suggestions as to what I might do differently. New jointer isn't an option right now.
tnx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have you done a complete check-up on co-planarity and flatness? If that's all good, raise the outfeed to within about 1/8th inch of full height and lock it, get all the blades to the same height, then unlock and tweak the outfeed table to the top of the blades by sneaking up on it from below. This should help negate the lash you're experiencing. It may take a few attempts to hit it just right. Then lock it and leave it. You shouldn't have to mess with outfeed adjustments unless you want to do tapers and the like. Tom snipped-for-privacy@pdq.net wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I should think it would work better to raise the outfeed table to just slightly above the blades and lock it -- then adjust the blades upward until they're a couple thousandths above the table. Much easier to make fine adjustments on the blade height than on the table.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@pdq.net wrote:

I'm guessing it is NOT a blade height problem--I don't see how that can create a cut proud in the middle. I'd suspect non-coplanar tables. Raise the infeed table to the same height as the outfeed, and after rotating the blades out of the way, put a long straight-dedge across the tables. If the outer ends of the tables are high, this would cause the cut I understand you to be getting. If the gibs on the outfeed table are out of adjustment or loose, that might account for slop in the outfeed table movement (although I can't picture the mechanism well, and can't figure how it could cause backlash).
Another technique, if you don't have a dependable long straightedge, is to get two plastic draftsman's triangles, put one on each table and see if the vertical sides meet perfectly.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote:

<elided>
Infeed and outfeed were WAY out of parallel and the infeed was lower next to the blades. That would explain the curve I was seeing.
They're now parallel and edges are straight (at least to 2 mils).
tnx for the suggestions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.