Joint type to use for 'blind' joint

All,
I am making a model display using 3/4" red oak - base is approx. 6" x 7", vertical section is approx. 10" x 7".
The upright section is not vertical, it is 15 deg. off vertical i.e., angle from top of base to face of the upright section is 105 deg.
My preference is to have the two pieces connected without any exterior visible evidence of the joint i.e., a blind joint.
Not being an experienced wood worker, researched the Internet and learned of full blind dovetail joints - just what I need!
After finding specific instructions on how to create such a joint when the two pieces are not at right angles - was apparent my skills were not sufficient to end up with anything usable.
Would appreciate any recommendations on recommended joint types that require only basic wood working skills.
Thanks in advance for your comments.
Regards,
Doug
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Yes, the blind dovetail is a challenge and isn't a beginner's joint. I've done them for the challenge, but quite frankly there are more reasonable modern day approaches that can be cut with machines. For example, use Splines.... An overly simplified description is to miter the sides to make your corners and cut a groove along the length of the mating surfaces into which a third piece, the spline is placed.
DAGS "wood spline joint" there are lots of references...
John
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IIUC you want to join the ends of these 7" wide boards to form an italic L shaped stand. This would be I think an easy method:
Presume you can plane the oak all round and cut a mitre in the ends to the angle you want so the meeting surfaces are good and close? Do that then use the incredible 'Mitre Bond' adhesive to join the boards in a few seconds. Don't glue your hands to it. The join may seem strong but could do with some reinforcing because the wood is bound to move and the glue won't allow that, so from the underside carefully drill and insert screws, nails, dowels or a combination of the three. Sand and polish, Voila!
Tim W
PS 'Mitre Bond' is the product name in the uk, used by kitchen fitters to assemble wooden mouldings, one bottle of clear adhesive and an aerosol of activator, you only need to hold the joint together for 60secs and it sets very hard. Don't know what you would call it in america, probably Baboon Glue or something.
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Douglas R. Hortvet, Jr. wrote:

Up to doing mortice & tenon? Not all that hard.
--

dadiOH
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section
top of

evidence of

blind
pieces are

anything
basic
A dowel butt joint should fit your requirement nicely and is a good joint for a beginner. http://sawdustmaking.com/About%20Joints/about_joints.htm Art
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"Douglas R. Hortvet, Jr." wrote:

-------------------------------- As others have suggested a mortise & tenon is one approach.
A blind dado is another very similar joint.
All you need is a router mounted in a table, a fence and a straight bit.
Lew
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It's not entirely clear from your description whether the vertical piece sits on top of the base, or if the bottom of the vertical piece is flush with the bottom of the bottom piece. The bottom of the base is hidden, right? For the first situation, you could of course just screw up through the bottom piece, but that's pretty obvious, so it's either not that configuration of you have some reason not to use screws. If it's the second situation you could use pocket screws. Hidden, strong and simple as can be.
Be aware that "strong as can be" might equate to "not strong enough" if you have a very heavy model. Anything under five pounds should be no problem at all.
R
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Thanks to everyone for their comments.
As R pointed out I did not completely describe the intended end result - which is for the bottom of the vertical piece to be flush with the bottom of the bottom piece.
The model is light - so joint strength is not a concern.
Also neglected to mention the power tools available are a 10" stationary radial arm saw and a table mounted router.
Will try the spline joint on some scrap pieces, as that will provide the desired result and is likely within my range of capability.
Again - thanks to all for the benefit of your experience.
May also try full blind dovetails on scrap pieces - just to see if I can do it.
Regards,
Doug

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Douglas R. Hortvet, Jr. wrote:

For what you are doing the simplest thing is:
1. Set your RAS to 15 degees and make a cut about 3/8" deep and the same from the edge on what will be the top of the bottom. Before doing that, bevel the bottom to 15 degrees.
2. Turn the RAS head and blade so the blade is horizontal and rip out the excess, winding up with a rabbet which will have a horizontal bottom and a 15 degree shoulder
3. Cut matching joints in the vertical piece(s?) in a similar manner
4. Glue the pieces together. NOTE: the grain direction on the vertical piece(s?) should be the same as the bottom.
If you don't like seeing the rabbet, you could make the vertical piece(s?) a bit narrower than the bottom, cut off a bit of the rabbet from the bottom and glue an edge strip on the sides of the piece(s?).
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Pocket screws are easier, particularly if you're doing a totally hidden joint. Splines are fine if you want the ends to show and you'll treat them as a decorative element. Otherwise, biscuits (can be done with a router) or a pocket hole jig (cheap and you'll find all sort of uses for it).
R
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"Douglas R. Hortvet, Jr." writes:

--------------------------- Buy them books, they eat the covers.
You have a table mounted router with a fence.
A natural to cut a stopped dado and a tenon to produce a totally blind joint.
No spline required.
Lew
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Try this link to see a great solution to your situation. I've used these bits in the past, and they make a fantanstically strong joint if you glue them and clamp them properly. This is where I was able to find mine, but you may want a different size. http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2082373/32861/Freud-Lock-Miter-Router-Bit-12-Shank-45-degrees-1532-CL-Freud-99034.aspx
Hope this helps! Kevin
--
The keener the eye, the better to see the target!

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Thanks Kevin - must admit to not being aware of lock miter router bits.
Will keep these in mind for future requirements.
Regards,
Doug
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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