Joint Strength

I'm building a pendulum cradle with a base that will consist of two end supports joined by a stretcher piece. The end supports will be a typical inverted T design:
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For this application, which joint would be stronger for attaching the "foot" to the vertical "style", a mortise and tenon or half lap?
Thanks Dave
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mortis and tenon

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or half lap?

Love it!
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Woodworking Techniques & Projects - Kreg Right Angle Clamp - Bosch 3912 (GCM12) 12" Compound Miter Saw - Dowelmax Doweling System - Ryobi CDL1802D Pro Series 18v Cordless Drill ------------------------------------------------------------
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Built the same cradle recently. Since I had 8/4 cherry, I mortised the bottom piece, but you could also make two nearly half-lap pieces and face glue 'em to get where you want to get. Be sure to leave shoulders on your tenon to resist wracking.
Doggerel aside, most of the resistance to wracking comes from the shoulders' contact with the piece at right angles. If you made a half-lap with shoulders, if you can conceive of what I'm speaking of, and used a fastener like a screw with great withdrawal resistance, you could certainly count on its lasting. Wouldn't look as nice as the glue up or a real piece of lumber, though.

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