Joining two boards

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So you aren't worried about getting the pieces to mate without a gap -- either lucky with straight stock or you haven't looked. Assuming you are lucky then I bet the resounding answer from the wreck will be "uhhhh use glue". Seriously though, if you are joining long long grain most any ww glue would be strong enough. End grain is a different matter. Repeat the mantra: biscuits are alignment aids.
hex -30-
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Of course I want the sides to mate without a gap, but I've already received good advice about joining the boards earlier..LOL. Therefore, that's no longer a concern.
Thanks for the advice.
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"SBH" wrote:

What will be the size of the finished board?
Lew
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13 3/4"
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Tue, Jan 8, 2008, 9:52pm snipped-for-privacy@bluebottle.com (SBH) doth posteth: Lew queried: What will be the size of the finished board?
To which wasshisname replied: 13 3/4"
Would that be: Length? Width? Thickness? Or all of them? Details, details, details - seriously lacking.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
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If you are planning on gluing the two boards end grain to end grain this would be an excellent application for a half lap joint.
This can easily be done with a back saw and a chisel.
The other posts about a method using a router or a table saw would work fine for a non-end grain butt joint.
G.S.
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That reminds me - - - - I've seen the router bits that make a sort double tongue and groove for joining boards. How are they for doing the ends? Lap joints would give more surface, but would these be OK for a lightly stressed place, such as the middle boards of a four board wide panel?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

For that, you need nothing. The adjacent boards hold things together quite nicely.
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dadiOH
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Hey, I bought a set (from MCLS) and have yet to do a project with them. They eat a lot of material. But do incease the gluing surfaces and lock the two boards nicely. There's a set with a "V-groove" mating approach as well.
From my experiments, the setup is important on a long board. If there is a warp, you want the bowed side down as you run it through the shaper/router table so as to assure the distance from one surface to the groove is as close to identical on both boards. A good "hold down" jig - maybe those wheelie things - is called for if edging a long board w/o a helper. They make nice cuts, On a "project" with good wood, I might try two or three passes using my PC890 in the table - but I've yet to try that.
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Tue, Jan 8, 2008, 8:19pm snipped-for-privacy@bluebottle.com (SBH) doth clarify with: (Slaps forehead) Ok, I'm an idiot. My apologies for the improper wording, I assume. After reading the advice I realized what I had said and I didn't mean joining as in "planing" or "smoothing". I meant the bonding of two boards end to end or side to side using a "biscuit jointer". Therefore, any help on this is appreciated.
Glue usually works for me. Or you can nail on a piece of wood to each for butt joining them; multiple pieces if side by side.
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wrote:

Of course. You can use a (long) hand plane, tablesaw, or a router table. None of these are as good nor fast as a jointer. Without a jointer, my personal choice is a hand plane.
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There must be quite a knack to that. I tried it once though only with a 12" plane, and though I got from one end to the other pretty well set, consistancy from one side of the board to the other was another thing. Or is it a case of the plane having to be wider than the board?
Regards,
Twayne
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Nope. It's a case of practice makes perfect. A longer plane will give a better reference surface, but any plane can be used to produce a flat surface. Note that while one is hogging the surface down to "close to flat", one typically works at an angle (30-40 degrees) to the longitudinal dimension of the lumber, typically from both sides until the surface is close to flat, then a smooth plan is used with the grain (longitudinally) to remove the marks from the rough surface.
Then, using that surface as a reference, scribe a reference line on all four sides, flip the board and repeat above procedure to the scribed reference line.
Takes lots of practice, sharp irons and a well tuned plane.
scott
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Thu, Jan 10, 2008, 12:09am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@devnull.spamcop.net (Twayne) doth query: There must be quite a knack to that. I tried it once though only with a 12" plane, and though I got from one end to the other pretty well set, consistancy from one side of the board to the other was another thing. Or is it a case of the plane having to be wider than the board?
Not really, more paying attention.
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Please excuse my ignorance. What is a "whiteboard"? To me, a whiteboard is what the high $ consultants use to explain why they cost so much.
Is it another name for pine?
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"Buck Turgidson" wrote:

AKA: Mystery wood AKA: Low quality. Cheap but not necessarily low cost.
Lew
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LOL, Its that white wood that the borg sells. It is no particular species but rather a possibility of being White Pine, Spruce, and or another wood that I cannot recall at the moment.

Sometimes it is, sometime is is not.

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Leon wrote:

Fir. The "mix" around here is hemlock, spruce, fir. The heavy ones are fir. No pine as "whitewood" but available as pine.
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Wed, Jan 9, 2008, 6:31pm jc snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (BuckTurgidson) doth queryeth; Please excuse my ignorance. What is a "whiteboard"? To me, a whiteboard is what the high $ consultants use to explain why they cost so much. Is it another name for pine?
That would have to be one Hell of a large whiteboard then before I'd believe 'em.
Pine would be Jummy wood.
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