Joining two boards

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I will be doing a project which will require me to join two 1 x 8 whiteboards for a wider board but I do not have a joiner. I may purchase one some day but for now, have never needed to use one and also waiting for the finances to straighten up a bit more before I do. Therefore, I was wondering if there is another option to use for joining these boards other than borrowing/renting a joiner?
Thanks for any input.
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I use my TS all the time for that purpose.
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Very helpful Leon. Geesh :^(
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In all seriousness, I use my TS and Rip fence to straighten boards all the time. If it is a long board I use a strait edge jig along the fence.
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I've done it several times with a TS too; all it takes is patience and a fine blade plus a spreader. One still sits in my living room; nary a crack or space to be seen anywhere, lo these past couple decades.
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Of course it can be done, but do you think if he could do it with his TS he would be asking the question to begin with?

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Rather than second-guessing him, I tried to relate that a TS is a usable tool and if that's all that's available, as it was when I used that method, it can be made to work. It's called reinforcing a previous comment.
He's free to consider it, or not. What compels you to second-guess his needs?
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There are a lot of things that can be done with a TS that many people don't know about, especially beginners.
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Thu, Jan 10, 2008, 2:21am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: There are a lot of things that can be done with a TS that many people don't know about, especially beginners.
Uh, you're not gonna tell us that it's things like what some people do with cordless drills and sawzalls are you?
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
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Attach a straight edge to the board being jointed and reference the base of a hand held router off of it. Use a staight bit to trim a 1/16" off of the board and you will have a clean edge ready for joining.
OR
Instead of referencing the router base off of the straight edge, use a straight bit with a bearing (See Flush Trim Bits at Woodcraft).
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SBH wrote:

The traditional way is a hand plane...
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snip

edge to one board so you are taking a very small cut off the side of the board. Clamp the second board slightly less than the diameter of the bit. Route both boards at the same time and the edges will be matching. Larry
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(Slaps forehead) Ok, I'm an idiot. My apologies for the improper wording, I assume. After reading the advice I realized what I had said and I didn't mean joining as in "planing" or "smoothing". I meant the bonding of two boards end to end or side to side using a "biscuit jointer".
Therefore, any help on this is appreciated.
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You really don't need biscuits for strength (if that is indeed your concern), but they do help with alignment. If you decide to use biscuits and you own a router you can perform the same operation using a router table and router.
You need the right bit: http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 323
Adjust the height of the bit to 'roughly' the center of thickness. Mark your biscuit location on the face of the board and move the board into the cutter (carefully-NO fingers near the bit!). Right side of board touches (facing router table - the side on the right) fence first and push the left side into the fence making contact with the bit.
If you always keep the board flat on the router table, the slots should all be aligned the same.
Good luck

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I should add that if you don't get all of the slots in the same place (center of thickness) you will end up throwing yourself out of alignment at some locations (i.e. the two faces will not be consistently flush from end to end). If this happens remove those troublesome biscuits and glue it up!
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"SBH" wrote in message

"end to end" ... a glued "scarf joint" is usually appropriate where strength of the join is a concern. Or, depending upon the project, a "butt joint" of some type may be sufficient, as you usually see in applications like flooring, or siding.
"side to side", which reduces, practically, to "long grain to long grain" as in panel glue-ups like table tops ... nothing but glue, and sufficient and artful clamping, is necessary.
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When I did mine I used a compound mite saw and set two angles (not sure of the terminology) so that I "scarfed" on both planes then glued up the matching ends. This helps make a joint that's difficult to see or at least doesn't stand out and adds gluing surface - and, I assume, strength.
One question, is te tool he (OP) referenced as a "Joiner" called a "Jointer?"
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How the heck would you clamp up something like that while the glue sets? Sounds like a nightmare.
The maximum surface area increase you could get would be 1.414 of the original dimension if the angle were 45 degrees.
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Thu, Jan 10, 2008, 12:03am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@devnull.spamcop.net (Twayne) doth query: How the heck would you clamp up something like that while the glue sets? Sounds like a nightmare. <snip>
Clamps, nails, weights, whatever - depends. Simple enough operation.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I quite agree.
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