Joinery

Howdy all, Short of buying a joiner, what is the most economical way to put a good jointed edge on pieces you're planning to glue together. (Making a panel. say)
S
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Used Jointer hand plane

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Granted. But with this process there is a certain amount of skill involved which I do not process yet.
S
On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 03:44:18 GMT, "danh"

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spiderrman wrote:

So acquire them! :)
I'm in the process of learning how to do just that. I started out because I can't afford a jointer (no room, no money) but now that I'm getting into it, I really enjoy working with hand planes. There's something gratifying about the gentle shick, shick, shick of it all.
The learning curve is pretty steep though. Before you can use the plane, you have to figure out how to adjust, and most importantly, how to *sharpen* the plane. That's half of the battle right there.
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You can also use a router on a table with an off set fence, a router with a pattern bit or bushing guide and a straight edge, a straight edge guide along a table saw fence, or, maybe it is time to develop the skill, it isn't something the good fairy is going to leave under your pillow.
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pixelated:

Clamp a dowel to the cheek and angle the plane slightly to put the iron all the way across the edge. If you pay attention to what you're trying to accomplish, you'll quickly get a nicely jointed edge.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Hmmm... I can see that. Cheaper'n that $40 jointing fence gizmo too.
I'll have to try it.
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If your board is shorter than a piece of plywood, cut a piece of plywood out of a sheet of plywood 8' long and a bit wider that the piece of wood you want to joint. Screw down or clamp the wood on top of that piece of plywood with the waste edge hanging over the edge closest to the blade. Use the opposite edge of the plywood as the guide against the fence.

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Use a Forrest WW2 saw blade in yer table saw. Man that thing leaves a nice edge! Saw-marks?!? what are those?!?
mikey.
spiderrman wrote:

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I suppose you could do it the same way you deal with curved boards:
Clamp it to a know straight board, and run that board along the fence of a TS to get a clean edge. Then you can simply turn it around and run the freshly cut edge directly against the fence to make the opposite edge parallel.
If you have a good blade you will have two good gluable edges.

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