Japanese Joinery

https://twitter.com/TheJoinery_jp
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On Tuesday, October 11, 2016 at 9:31:53 AM UTC-4, Spalted Walt wrote:

Obviously a lot of glue area on some of those joints, but I gotta ask:
How many of those joints actually exist outside of a computer?
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All of them?
http://www.spoon-tamago.com/2016/10/04/animated-gifs-illustrating-the-art-of-japanese-wood-joinery/
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On 10/11/2016 5:01 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

If I had been exposed to this at an early age it would have been all over for me ... I'm not into Zen, but I could get lost, mind and body, in doing that kind of joinery, but it would have to be on my terms, IOW, to the exclusion of everything else.
Reminds of when I taught myself to code when I was much younger ... get lost in for days, or sometimes weeks.
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2016 17:42:29 -0500, Swingman wrote:

I was a programmer for 40+ years. Thought I'd never do it again after I retired. Then I discovered Arduino - now I write code for my model railroad :-).
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On 10/11/2016 6:01 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

See https://fabiap.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/wood-joints-in-classical-japanese-architecture.pdf
Includes drawings with measurements and some strength analysis. Many lock with no glue at all.
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Thank you for the excellent pdf, Larry! The complexity of their style is mind boggling. The math on pg 88 through the finished corner hip roof joint on pg 95 is completely amazing.
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I guess - no glue on many of them. They exist on the fancy furniture and boxes and whatnot.
The craftsman might work on the project for months. We do the same in hours or days.
Martin
On 10/11/2016 4:27 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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says...

We use strong-ties and lots of nails, the Japanese use precision workmanship. Some buildings built their way have been in continuous use for more than a thousand years. How many built with Strong-Ties and Loctite will still be standing after that span of time?
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Danged if I know. What I do know is, they burn great in a firestorm.
nb
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There are plenty of wood structures standing after 600 years. One just has to be in that country and see the old buildings.
The Old English "Eastburn Manor" - is still standing and in good shape. It was there a very long time ago.
Cultures in Japan and China and some other places have existed and they stayed in the same area / site for much of or all of the time.
Martin
On 10/12/2016 4:28 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

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On 10/13/2016 10:56 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

When I was living in the UK, used to visit a pub, "The Royal Standard of England" that was 900 years old at the time ... built ten years before the Battle of Hasting in 1066.
Took this photo circa 1963:
https://goo.gl/photos/Jy9m1mm5XLDHgCet5
The notable thing, besides its age, was how short the doorways were. Folks were obviously shorter in that part of the world before the Normans invaded. LOL
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Swingman wrote:

Is that vinyl siding ?
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On 10/14/2016 3:22 PM, G. Ross wrote:

I don't think Mr Robinson whispered "plastics" into Ben's ear until 1968?
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On Oct 11, 2016, DerbyDad03 wrote

The Japanese use no glue at all, and are very proud of it.
All of these joint types are used, somewhere.
In buildings, strong joints, which are intentionally complex, to dissipate earthquake energy in the joint friction. There are no triangle braces or plywood shear sheets in Japanese building frames.
In furniture, beautiful joints. Japanese furniture can be taken apart and put back together without damage.
And, as others have noted, they have many wooden buildings that are 1,000 years old. Glue would be goo or dust by now.
Joe Gwinn
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2016 13:31:45 +0000

they also have taken joinery to the next level with cnc
the joints are too complex to do by hand
interestingly they used gluelam beams and cnc to create large spans that require no load bearing supports that would normally break up the space
think it was a music auditorium they built using this technique
the beams were curved also which added to the complexity of the joint and led them to cnc milled joints
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