Japanese drying agent

I was told that an excellent finish for wood was tung oil, varnish, mineral spirits and japanese drying agent. Does anyone else have any info on this. And what quantities of these agents would I use.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Google on "Japan drier".
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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If it was so excellent someone would be selling it. They might even call it danish oil.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You are talking about the basic recipe for about a million different home brew and over the counter recipes. The one thing you don't need in the mix is the japan drier. That was developed years ago as an agent to hurry the drying time of the old oil base finishes that you used to paint wood trim, doors, houses etc., and anything else that was painted. It was developed because the old oil bases took hours and hours to dry. You literally could come back after painting on a 60 degree day to the house or project and it would still be sticky the next day, 24 hours later.
Not good.
But it changes the properties of the resins and I personally have burned up finishes by putting that stuff in them. Use more thinner in your finish, or a hotter thinner, not Japan drier to get the finish to kick faster.
Robert
It precluded the appearanc
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You are talking about the basic recipe for about a million different home brew and over the counter recipes. The one thing you don't need in the mix is the japan drier. That was developed years ago as an agent to hurry the drying time of the old oil base finishes that you used to paint wood trim, doors, houses etc., and anything else that was painted. It was developed because the old oil bases took hours and hours to dry. You literally could come back after painting on a 60 degree day to the house or project and it would still be sticky the next day, 24 hours later.
Not good.
But it changes the properties of the resins and I personally have burned up finishes by putting that stuff in them. Use more thinner in your finish, or a hotter thinner, not Japan drier to get the finish to kick faster.
Robert
It precluded the appearanc
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