It was bound to happen...

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Mr. Mulligan's Steam Shovel.
GTO(John)
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On 15 Oct 2004 21:50:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GTO69RA4) wrote:

ROFL!!!
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Now THAT takes me back!!! I loved that book as a kid.
Grant
GTO69RA4 wrote:

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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 12:43:06 -0500, "Grant P. Beagles"

Mike Mulligan and Mary Anne. My oldest is into that one too. He also likes Ferdinand, another oldie. The only problem w/ Ferd is that when we get to the part where he sits on a bumblebee, my son jumps around on the bed as if he was stung.
Kind'a takes the point out of "calming down" to fall asleep.
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Don't feel bad. Many many years ago a neighbor who was an engineer (docks & piers in Seattle etc) & built a small fishing boat that resembled a tug. Had an in-line 4-banger eng. Beautiful craftsmanship. Built it in his double garage (tri-level home w/ 2 garage doors & garage below part of the house) that had a support pillar between them. Naturally the boat turned out when completed to be 3" wider than the doorway. He'd forgotten to take into account the final trim pieces on the sides, and of course they were already glued, screwed and painted. He'd forgotten his own change order! He of course added a temp support piller, removed the original setup & got the boat out but the point is, it can happen to anyone. Grandpa John
Jac wrote:

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Fri, Oct 15, 2004, 7:56pm (EDT-2) jsdebooATcomcast.net (Grandpa) says: <snip> the boat turned out when completed to be 3" wider than the doorway. <snip> He of course added a temp support piller, removed the original setup & got the boat out but the point is, it can happen to anyone.
I've heard of that happening, and similar solutions. And, then, after all that, the builders realized that if they'd just tipped it a bit, it would gone out.
JOAT Flush the Johns. - seen on a bumper sticker
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Two stories come to mind.
Bob Methalis built a Jake's chair. It was painted the requisite green. It was beautiful. It was too big. It stayed in the shop as a shop chair. He never let himself live it down. He eventually sold the house and I think it's still there.
A couple/few years back there was a guy who needed to get some 'chinery down stairs. He cut a hole in the family room floor, located some scaffolding over the hole and winched it down from there. Pictures of this little excursion were posted on Al Gore's Whirled Wild Web.
Sorry. No solutions. Just thought you'd like to know you have company.
UA100, who might be adding onto the basement shoppe and would like a 48" wide garage entrance to the shoppe but knows the added expense might put the kibosh on the whole thing...
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Boy, what a painful experience this is for you. My condolences.
I am very fortunate to have stairs that go straight down to my basement shop. There was only once that I built a project so large as to concern me about it removal from said shop. I took measurement after measurement double checking as much as possible.
What I'm thinking is that either your project has to get some creative modifications or some parts rebuilt.
If changing the project in any way isn't possible, then some changes to the house will have to be done, assuming you don't want to leave the table in the basement.
To be honest, from my POV, dining tables ought to have removeable portions just to make it easier or even possible to get in and out of a room. I built a plain old Shaker style table, about as ordinary in design as can be, but made sure the legs were removeable. Otherwise it may still live in my basement. Or be unable to pass the average doorway.
I've toured through the new houses of family and friends, and just don't understand why the stairs to the basement are positioned so poorly from a getting stuff in and out POV. Whatever happened to straight in? Whatever happened to good old trap doors accessible from outside? That last idea was very common in the neighborhood I grew up in. My sisters house has the basement stairs off a narrow central hallway in her house. For me, no matter how nice that house or others like it is, makes it impossible to ever buy without adding an additional easy access. If the house has a basement, it should be easily used.
On 15 Oct 2004 09:52:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Jac) wrote:

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Well, thanks for all the support, and good-if-somewhat-nuts advice! The Bilco door is sounding good (a project for next summer) as is the trap door into the living room (just for the novelty of it).
I am in better humor about this today. At SWMBO's urging (after she quit laughing her ass off), i have not gone back down into the basement to stare at this for a couple of days. I will go back tomorrow and see if a new day brings new vision...
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Jac) wrote in message

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This is what I do - take a few deep breaths and a few days to put it in perspective. Nothing is ever as bad as you think it is - unless of course you are a pro and your reputation is involved!
Otherwise, the absolute worse case is that you cut it up, re-use what you can and do it over. No big deal in the long run - and think of the great story you can tell while sitting around (the new) dining room table at Thanksgiving & Christmas for many years to come...
A little sappy, but true.
Lou
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On 16 Oct 2004 16:55:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Jac) wrote:

Always a good plan. Most bad situations can be made much worse by continued effort.
Back when I worked with my dad doing construction (mostly remodeling) he had a policy that before we started any particularly complex piece of work we would sit down and have a cup of coffee and think about it. Saved us thousands of dollars.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Sat, Oct 16, 2004, 4:55pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Jac) says: Well, thanks for all the support, and good-if-somewhat-nuts advice! The Bilco door is sounding good (a project for next summer) as is the trap door into the living room (just for the novelty of it).<snip>
Actually, I was serious about the trapdoor. My great-grandparents had one in their kitchen. Linoleum floor, and you never noticed it, unless your attention was drawn to it, not small either, probably 4' X 6'. Had a ring that llifted up, for a pull handle.
They had a Michigan basement - you build the house, then dig a basement. This was the only access to it. Well, actually, the house is still there. In their case, not a huge basement, used more as a root cellar, where she kept canned goods, etc.
Of course, if you make something too big to go thru an outside door, it's staying in the house. In that case, you might want the outside entrance. Otherwise, I'd go with the trapdoor.
JOAT Flush the Johns. - seen on a bumper sticker
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