It got me. -Kickback

Page 2 of 2  
Stoutman wrote:

apron from Rockler. You gotta buy this stuff and more importantly you gotta USE it every time.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Sat, Jun 2, 2007, 5:13pm .@. (Stoutman) doth sayeth <snip> NO splitter. NO push stick. <snip> I do not cnsider lack of a spltter a big deal; "do" cnsider no push stick a biig deal. VERY big deal, you were NOT standing out of the line of fire.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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(Stoutman) doth sayeth

Like my old shop teacher used to say. You have stand in a position that if you had a heart attack and died, no wood would hit you. He referred to it as the "collapse" position. I once asked him if this "collapse" happened very often. He said these famous words, 'If you cut wood long enough, it will".
I only got hit once. All those old lessons came rushing back. I haven't forgot since. The bruise I got took over a month to heal.
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woodworkers Supply sells leather Aprons, as well as welding supply houses. I have been hit above the groin and was thankfull I was not taller.I allways thought a piece would come straight back as it did in my case. It was brought to my attention that sheet stock would fly at me if i was standing to the left of the blade. I use a gripper for small parts and the magnetic featherboard holders for ripping longer parts.
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Sun, Jun 3, 2007, 2:16am leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net (LeeMichaels) doth sayeth: That little point is SO important. Like my old shop teacher used to say. <snip>
My shop teacher didn't say that. What he did was explain what kickback was, then he purposely caused one, so we coud all see it. VERY impressive. Then he told us to stay out of the way of a kickback and we wouldn't have any problem. That was 1955, I was 14 1/2. That was the first year we were allowed to use the table saw on our own, before then all cutting was done by the shop teacher. I still remember that every time I use my saw.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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Walnut shims? Nice! Glad you're technically okay. Tom
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Glad to hear you are able to still type. ;~) It happens to every one at least once, you let your guard down and do not realize it until it's too late. Fear not a more powerful saw. I tripled the HP when I up graded and IMHO the blade tends to cut rather than stall and throw providing you have control of the situation. I have felt many "starts" of kickbacks on the bigger saw but was easily able to push against the wood and prevent lift off.
If you don't have a set yet, not is a good time to consider the Gripper set up. You get a very firm handle on things. I recommend using in pairs.
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Cutting squares or smaller pieces increase the chance of kickback. I like to stand out the "kickback danger zone." A bandsaw would be a safer choice. I use a canvas apron but not for family-jewel protection.
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Very true. Any time the length of the cut is not greater than the distance to the fence, especially if cut length is also less than the length of the exposed blade, you're in a crosscut situation and it should be treated as such irrespective of whatever direction the wood's grain is running.
IMO, the terms "rip" and "crosscut" relative to wood grain direction have meaning in the Neander world because of the difference in handsaw tooth form and sharpening. Normites at the tablesaw should forget grain direction and look strictly at cut geometry in treating a cut as a "rip" or "crosscut" and act accordingly. Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Sat, 2 Jun 2007 17:13:27 -0400, Stoutman wrote:

Forget the apron, unless it has a steel plate in it.
For that kind of cut, use a sled.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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