is waferboard truly oriented strand board?

this might be more appropriate for a group on carpentry if there is one.
is there a type of oriented strand board which is not waferboard? Does anyone have anything to say about how well waferboard or osb can be expected to hold up, over a decade, without special protection or preparation? I suspect carpenters do not usually seal cut ends of the board against moisture.
thanks, any information appreciated
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"is there a type of oriented strand board which is not waferboard?"
I don't know
"Does anyone have anything to say about how well waferboard or osb can be expected to hold up, over a decade, without special protection or preparation?"
It'll last in a vertical application. Will look like crap in a short time and you better be ready to replace it when that decade is up.
"I suspect carpenters do not usually seal cut ends of the board against moisture."
No, we never do but it's always protected by shingles, tyvek, brick, siding, etc.. I'm assuming you want to use this in an exterior application. If this is the case, don't. If you're talking about building exterior walls and covering it up with siding or whatever, go for it. It's a very good product when used correctly. Stands up to a moderate amount of rain if you can't get it covered up right away as well. I've worked in homes which got quite a bit of rain on the sub-floor before the roof was on. The edges swell up a lot but a floor sander takes good care of that. The only carpentry n.g. I'm aware of is pdaxs.services.carpentry but the last time I checked, nobody ever posts there. Seems most of us carpenters are too busy drinking beer (Broke Back Syndrome Medication) after work to become computer literate. What are you using it for?
Kevin
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You can expect poor results with that material if it is exposed to any kind of high humidity or moisture. In the Houston area some builders are using OSB to deck the roofs and after a few years you can easily see where each rafter is under the OSB. The sag is terrible. Better to use a more stable plywood of the proper thickness if appearance is of any concern.
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kind
stable
Have you used plywood on building many houses in the last couple years? I have, and the quality of plywood is not what it used to be. I have had a lot of delaminations lately. I think it is because OSB has gotten so cheap, it is stealing a market share, so they are trying to make the plywood faster, with less glue, ect. My latest house is getting an OSB type tongue and groove floor. The new generation is supposed to not have the swelling and flaking problem.
We will see!
--
Jim in NC



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In the FWIW category - A couple of years ago I made up several 'Flamingo's ', a 'Palm Tree', and a 'Shark' for the yard, and the neighbors yard. Used some scraps & 1/2 sheet of '7/8' OSB from the local HD. Cheap, plus if it started to delaminate & get 'rough around the edges' the figures would simply look more realistic as 'feathers'. I don't know if this stuff was 1st or 2nd 'generation. All I know it was under $8.oo/sheet, one side smooth and the other side rough.
Anyhow, I primed the surfaces with KILZ Quick Drying Water-based Outdoor Primer. Used templates to transfer the patterns, cut them our, and primed the edges. A light sanding and a second coat of primer. This was followed by two coats of the final colors. Again, Water-based Acrylic paint - HD 'house-brand'.
That was at least two years ago. The 'Shark' is attached, at ground level, to the side of the raised bed veggie garden. The dogs, the lawnmower, struck by grass clippings, sprayed water, Summer sun & rain, Winter snow & cold. Nothing that a squirt with a hose and a swipe with a soapy sponge won't cure. The same ambient conditions for the 'up-right' figures - less the dirt & grass.
I didn't do anything special . . . just cheap & quick. They look great.
Some time before, we used a chunk of '1/2' inch thick stuff that was originally part of an 'on-site-made' box for covering an outdoor telephone circuit box during some commercial construction. We used it for a 'ramp' to 'drive' wheelbarrows loaded with topsoil over the 4inch 'lip' on the new patio to get to the back lawn we were renovation to improve drainage. No coating, no protection, no nothing. After that, we used it as a 'flat place' to stand the 2 inch wheels {solid plastic} of the 220 pound 'folding' utility trailer, so we could lash it to the side of the garage. There it sat for about 3-4 years. I finally had a use for the trailer . . . this summer. The 'board' looked a bit dark with 'rain dirt', but not even dents from the wheels !!
I don't think I'll have any qualms about using it around the house. A half-hour of actual priming & painting {and the patience to wait the required drying/curing times} . . . and Bob's your Uncle !!
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {PS: Also used most of a sheet to close in the door way behind my wood stove. Set flush with the outer cinder block wall, the block thickness for an insulating air space, and an old Aluminum 'stop sign' as an inner reflector. A oversized collar stuffed with fiberglass lets the 'stack' pass through. Doesn't get more than body temperature.}

one.
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one.
There used to be another one that looked like strands of wood, but I haven't seen it around in a long time.
OSB is getting better all the time. It used to be pure junk, then it was crap, now it is acceptable (imo) to use for roofs and sidewalls.
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Manny Davis wrote:

Hey, I'd rather have junk than crap any day. You can build stuff out of junk. Crap isn't much good for anything unless you're a dog.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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