Is this odd?

I've never heard of a nine inch saw before. Never saw blades for sale anywhere either.
Is this Rockwell saw proprietary like the old Tandy stuff or do/did others make a nine inch saw? http://newjersey.craigslist.org/tls/286378426.html
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Wow, that one looks a lot nicer than my 9" rockwell saw. The wings look especially nice and hefty.
As for blades, I'm using a Hitachi 8.5" miter saw blade, and I've not had any problems functionality-wise.
If you're looking at buying it, I can certainly vouch for the viability of a 9" table saw.
-Nathan
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My dad used to have a 9" Craftsman TS. It was probably 60's vintage, perhaps earlier. It was not crap. It was a solid, although smallish (by modern 10" Contractor saw standards) saw.

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About 30 years ago, there was a really nifty Hitachi 9" table saw that was the mother to all portable table saws. It had a good fence, reasonably sized table with some kind of slick coating on it, and the top was thick aluminum/magnesium. Many of the custom trim guys had them (that's where I saw them) as well as wood floor guys (remember when wood floors were all 3/4 to 7/8" real wood?). 9" blades were purchased at the local contracting store or at Sears.
It was big, bulky, heavy, solid and expensive. But at that time, the only game in town. All those guys that had it loved the saw, and I distinctly remember that being one of the tools I never saw in the pawnshops when we had work slowdowns.
Robert
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Not "odd", just old.:-) I have a Delta 9" table saw that I would not part with. It dates back to the early 1950s. It replaced my father's 1940s vintage 9" Delta. Blades are not always the easiest things to find, and I have been known to use a 10" blade.
It, of course is not my only table saw (now), but for many years it was. Its main roll in life today, is for dado work. By doing this, I can use my 10" Grizzly for cutting and don't have to continually swap blades.
__________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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RayV wrote:

I have a Craftsman 9" Radial Arm Saw that I bought in '73 when the model was discontinued. It has served me well for almost 34 years now. Back then the Craftsman table & Radial arm saws were made by Emerson Electric.
--Steve
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 04:55:37 -0800, RayV wrote:

Just bought a 9" Rockwell radial arm saw. From what I could gather Rockwell invented the "electric miter saw" but didn't profit from it by not applying for a patent. I had some difficulty finding a 9" blade for it at first and was disappointed, but eventually noticed they really are everywhere, made by several manufacturers. You just need to dig into the catalogs. You won't find them at HD or Lowes despite one of those big box stores showing a 9" blade in their online catalog.
The blade I got was a Tri-Tek #4490301, 9" 30 teeth, Pro Grade, tungsten carbide tips. Cost around $20-25 at Amazon.com. Just go to amazon.com and search on: tri-tek 9" blade. Not sure how this translates to a table saw, but this miter saw is really excellent. Very powerful and I'm impressed with the cutting quality after putting on the new blade.
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I had that same model, upgrade from a circular saw bolted upside down to a sheet of plywood. Flexible sheet metal top. Broke the blade height adjuster -- essentially a piece of all-thread and a hex nut -- at the spot welds. Not worth repairing, especially since 9" blades are not common even in combination grind. Gutted it, saved the handwheels, motor (not a bad one for a universal), and base, which looks useful for holding a grinder. Replaced it with a Delta CS, tricked out and tuned up like a Swiss watch.
Save your money. If you're patient, a good cast iron contractor's saw will pop up on c-list for your $100.
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