Is this a Safe Table Saw Operation?

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You are assuming that if all goes well/ "if it's well controlled and held firmly in place". Accidents typically happen when all does not go well. Work around a TS long enough and you will eventually realize that all does not go well 100% of the time. I'll be the first to say that I have used the fence for stock that is close to square and often when cutting cabinet panels I use the fence to cut to length panels where the fence setting is greater than the length of the cut. Is that safe???? "NO"!!!. I do however know what can happen if my hand slips, or if I don't keep the panel tightly planted against the fence, keep a large portion of my body weight on top of the panel, use stock that bows away from the fence, etc and I am prepared for the consequences should the panel bind.
No amount of preparation can prevent every accident. Taking chances increases the odds of having an accident.
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You can take it for granted I make that assumption on every operation. Otherwise, I would do it some other way.

I'll agree with the platitude, but I don't see what's so magic about square. Is ripping 2" from a 10x10" square any better or worse?
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Square or close to it is a good rule of thumb of observe that you are starting to deal with a shape that is less going to be less stable against the fence than material that is longer than it is wide.
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Leon wrote:

A beginner, When you cut plywood you should only use the fence when the width against the fence is greater the the length being cut. Does this not depend on the actual measurements? ie 5" X 3" ( 3" on the fence cut 5" ) would be unsafe? 5' X 3' ( 3' on the fence cut 5') would be unsafe?
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I think you are on track if I read you correctly. Basically, think which orientation the stock is in and how the blade would have more leverage to pull the edge against the fence away from the fence. If that happens kick back is almost inevitable. The smaller the piece the greater the risk.
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I don't know what the hard and fast rules are for clearance/distance of hands away from a cutter.
But I know that a lot of it has to do with your body's reaction time, for when a slip or kickback occurs which may push or pull your body or body parts a certain direction.
Have you ever been watching a baseball game and seen a batter check his swing and think he didn't "go," only to see the slow motion replay and realize the bat traveled a much further distance that what appeared to the naked eye?
There are times when we "think" we have plenty of room for our fingers to clear, but when there's a slip or kickback, our body parts travel much further than we think they would, before we have the ability to check our swing.
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-MIKE- wrote:

In the scenario described I'd use my hand (4" is lots of clearance), but I'd hang a few fingers over the fence to make it harder for my hand to be pulled towards the blade.
Combined with the guard, I'd do this cut carefully but I wouldn't feel particularly unsafe.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Sounds reasonable. I wasn't necessarily replying to you, but the general concept.
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If you asked then you already are unsure and therefore unsafe.
I use one similar to this:
http://www.scrgeek.com/pics/ww/jigs/jigEdge4.jpg
Try different ones cut from plywood and see what you like. I never liked the dinky orange stick that came with my saw and only used it once or twice.
http://www.ptreeusa.com/Peach%20Graphics/push_stick.jpg
try a google image search http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&rlz=1T4ADBS_enUS259US259&q=home+made+push+stick
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In a word, no. Make a crosscut sled for this type of cut - you'll like it. It's stable, and easier to measure and control.
In general, any cut where the length of the stock is less than the length of the blade is asking for trouble.
shelly
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On Jan 20, 4:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote: ...

No, that's taking a general rule and carrying it to an absurd conclusion.
The point isn't the L/W ratio, it's whether there's sufficient bearing surface on the fence to keep the piece from wanting to turn as it heads thru the blade. A rail stile cut to length is obvious.
Where the transition point is, is, imo, somewhat nebulous and dependent on operator comfort, material and even the saw/blade combination (a good saw w/ sharp, appropriate blade is far better than an underpowered one w/ a pos or dull blade that will want to bind/slug down instead of zipping right on thru. A 5x5 piece of 3" oak I'd treat differently from the subject ply as well...
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On Jan 20, 5:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I would agree with this. The sled is the way to go and you will always have it. My read on what the OP said tells me he is using one of those push sticks with the little notch on the end, which is fine for this with the guard in place. But if it isn't then he should have a shoe type of push device.
Take this advice from somebody that did cut the end of his finger off, the day I did it the did not feel safe doing what I was doing, but could not find an intellectual reason that anything would go wrong, so I did it. Things happened so fast after that I still can't believe it. Doing what you described just brought back that same feeling, I even went out to the table saw (uplugged) and simulated it. There is no way I would put my hand into that situation. Make the sled, it will be one of the most used tools in your shop.
-Jim
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wrote:

No. A square that small might turn and that may result in a nasty kickback. You don't ever want a small piece of wood wedged between the blade and the fence.
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In article

If in doubt, don't!
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 09:52:46 +0000 (GMT), Stuart

I hope I can help prevent an injury here. Before you make the cut, stop and seriously ask yourself if there is a safer way to make this cut. Nobody will criticize you for working more safely, and for woodworking, you need to keep as many fingers as possible.
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Grrrripper table saw accessory. Best store bought push stick thing-a-ma-jig ever. Robb
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wrote:

Grrrripper table saw accessory. Best store bought push stick thing-a-ma-jig ever. Robb
Anybody run a Gripper into the blade? I'm wondering if they explode like the plastic push sticks that come (or used to come??) with Delta and Jet tools...
John
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If you are interested, I just posted a photo of the push stick I use on alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking. Easily holds a 5" piece of wood.
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message

Very similar to the design I've been using for years:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/PushStick.jpg
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I see you posting a lot in the last couple of days. Are you back at home or using that new fangled phone in the field? LOL
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