Is this a gloat

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I just got my grandfathers old Stanley No. 5 Anyone tell me some info on this plane?
Searcher1
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Sorry, no gloat. There's gazillions of them. Read about it here http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm#num5
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

Disagree. Anytime that you can get something that's been in the family passed down to you with emotional context it's a gloat. Show us a picture and describe it, and it's blade, a bit better it may be more than just what it appears. At the very least the age could be interesting. Your GD may not have bought it new.
Dave in Fairfax
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Well, it's got a bit of rust on it, the edges are straight and smooth, the bottome is grooved. All adjustments seem to move freely but the handle is broken but intact
Searcher1

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So what you have is a 5C, for corrugated.
check out Patrick Leach's site: www.supertool.com , for more than you ever wanted to know about vintage Stanley hand tools.
Personal opinion: Old tools have a soul, a part of their former owners. Keep yours alive. Use it.
Patriarch
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I think st james bay tool has handles for that....
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote in

DAGS for "plane wood". There are lots of sources for replacements, if you aren't up to making your own. We ARE woodworkers, aren't we?
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

It's a bit of a bitchy job though. I shaped one to perfection, finished it with beeswax, and then drilled the hole. Through the side of the handle. :(
Sacrificed that one to JOAT's woodworking gods. The beeswax burned good.
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The handles not that bad and I can still use it rather well, Boy this thing really stayed sharp over all those years. I cleaned it up and it looks great for its age. I will use it and I am sure that my GF soul is in this thing. When I visit my GM I look at those doors and think this plane fit those doors!
RIch

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Searcher wrote:

Good for you. THAT'S the feeling I was talking about. When you need new tote and knob, Woodcraft sells the set for about $25. SAVE the nut and shaft that go through each peice, the threads won't match the ones to modern Stanleys. If you have a bandsaw, and a lathe, you can make your own totes and knobs as you need them. Give me a yell if you have any questions.
Dave in Fairfax
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Sorry, I wasn't demeaning emotional or family value. When someone uses "gloat" in this conference, I think of it being defined in terms of monetary value. Emotional and family value is worth far more than money, if its your own family. Gloat is a bad term to be used with anything that is a family heirloom or momento.
Bob
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I didn't take it in a demeaning way, no worries....BB! Being relativley new to WW and with all the talk of old Stanleys from time to time I thought this might be something special aside from the fact that it was my GF's.
Searcher1

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new
this
Old Stanley's are a cost effective way to get a good quality plane for your shop. They generally sell for $50-$150 on ebay. There are a few special rare models, but most of them follow a kind of supply-demand ebb and flow. They are also subject to the occasional ebay buyer psychosis, which runs the price up. A common Stanley plane in excellent condition with intact decals seems to drive a feeding frenzy, even if the plane was made in 1960. A No. 8 seems to always bring $80 or more, even if its a piece of crap. I guess there are not as many of them around.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

Conference. Wow, you just showed your age, or your roots, or both. :)

I disagree with you, and agree with Dave. Wholeheartedly. There are a bazillion #5s on eBay, but only one #5 inherited from Grandpa.
Gloats aren't always about money.
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I have a no.5 i bought at a flea market on our honey moon coupla years ago for $30. Since we had a "level 3" snow emergency here Thursday, work was cancelled, so i finally had time to restore the old plane. I sanded the base from 60 to 600grit (which took hours!), sanded the sides to 320 then polished, buffed, sharpened, painted and cleaned the whole thing. It looks and works like brand new! I discovered the chip breaker has "Stanley" markings and a patent date as "Dec 24 1867", the brass knob said "Bailey's" and "patented 1858" which is an earlier date than anything I've recently discovered googling. The adjusting lever also says "Stanley". This thing turned out so nice, i don't know if i can bring myself to put it back into service. Right now, it is sitting on a shelf on my desk looking all shiny and new. Good thing I have another one just like it but with no maker markings, i think i'll tune that one up and keep it in the shop to use! Good gloat, tune it up and make some shavings, grampa would be roud! --dave

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Ok, well, maybe next time. But its still a nice looker, I'll put er on the shelf.
Rich AKA Searcher1

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Searcher wrote:

On the shelf? Do you have a #5 already? Sharpen it up and make some shavings with it. It's what your grandpa would have done.
They're not exquisite rare collectibles, but they *are* incredibly useful little critters. I have two of them, and use both of them regularly.
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Oh, hey wait a minute, I think this ones corrogated, WOuld that be grooves on the bottom?
Searcher1

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It would be a 5C. The "C" stands for corrugated. In theory, it helps to alleviate friction in planing.
Bob
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grooves
A number of Christmases ago my father gave me a Stanley plane. It was my first ever plane, and I'm surprised that I use it ten times more than I ever expected to. (I now have three planes and enjoy them all.) But this one is a Stanley plane marked as product 12-205, and inside the manual, under the same column as 5/5C, it's marked H1205. The dimensions are all the same as 5/5C. Anybody know what's the difference?
- Owen -
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