Is There An Endgrain In Particleboard?

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There is no "grain" to particleboard, end or otherwise. It is made up of small, randomly oriented fragments of wood fiber (basically sawdust) in a resin binder. Threaded fasteners frequently fail in particleboard because there is little structural integrity to the material.
The fix for your particular problem is to bore out the failed screw hole, glue in a hardwood dowel, drill a pilot hole and reinstall the screw.

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...or maybe, glue the dowel at right angles to the screw. A screw into the endgrain of most any wood is a weak attachment. This is a picture of something I did last summer rebuilding a desk. The pine serves as a substrate for a quarter inch oak plywood top glued to the substrate. I drilled the holes 5/8" with a Forstner bit and used hardwood dowels. Also I used pocket screws predrilled through the oak trim on the desk edge. The screw holes were then plugged with matching oak. Of course, I realize that my suggestion just might not be feasible for this particular problem.
http://home.mchsi.com/~lhote5/deskedge.jpg
Larry
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Lawrence L'Hote
Columbia, MO
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Randomly oriented in three dimensions?
I think not.
They may be randomly oriented in the horizontal plane but they are oriented horizontally in layers. Therefore, there is end grain.
As Paul sez, compare the paint sucking ability of edge vs face.
djb
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sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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Tom Watson wrote:

Well, particle board can refer to a variety of things but..
Considering the considerable difference in paint sucking ability of MDF on its edge vrs. its face, I would have to say it is oriented in some fashion.
For the sheet goods made of coarser chips, it is quite evident from looking at it that the press process orients the chips "flat"; this would indeed make it directional. This is probably true for MDF as well, it is just harder to observe; anything composite made of non-symmetrical bits would tend to exhibit this I would think.
OTOH, man-made materials is certainly not my field of expertise.
PK
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Particle board, MDF & OSB are all quite different products.; they all have their uses. MDF has decent strength, machines well & accepts paint well. It is not particle board but it isn't furniture grade hardwood either.
Particle board is just that; made of wood particles; not much better than coarse sawdust.
MDF is made from wood fibers that are generated by breaking down wood chemically to the fiber level.
OSB is made from wood species that cannot be "peeled"; but can chipped or flaked.
That said; the faces of all particle board, MDF & OSB are denser than the edges, thus generating "end grain" or directionality behavior.
Source of info:
f2f discussion with APA wood specialists
cheers Bob
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Translation - termite shit.
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On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 09:22:55 -0500, the inscrutable "Mike Marlow"

Answer to original question: Any given rectangular piece of particleboard has a total of -6- planes of endgrain. Feh!
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Where some are less equal than others. :-)

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I don't like or use particle board.
Didn't like OSB too much until I did a fair amount of work with it (shearwall testing); changed my opinion.
MDF id pretty good stuff; strong, machines well and paints up nice. I use it a lot for shop garage cabinets / shelving.
MDF has 4 planes of "endgrain" but one can work around it.
cheers Bob
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<snip>

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walking by, sees a pot, sees the stick sticky from it, tempted to stir but realizes, not enough time in the day and moves along...
Burma Shave
UA100
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I call it an "edge" rather than an "endgrain." In any event, there are special screws for particleboard. I have had success using a piano hinge (lots of small screws) to attach an MDF door. A screw in the edge is more likely to fail than into a face due to more support in the surrounding area.
wrote:

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wrote:

Physical Properties* Density 45 lbs/cu ft Internal Bond 80 psi Modulus of Rupture 1900 psii Modulus of Elasticity 340,000 psi Screw Holding - Face 235 lbs Screw Holding - Edge 180 lbs *Physical properties tested by using method ASTM D 1037-91
http://www.collinswood.com/M1_WoodProducts/M1H4A1_Particleboard.html
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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wrote:

bigger difference in holding power.
TWS
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Just for my education, any idea of the screw holding capabilities of some of the hardwoods you regularly use, measured in a similar manner?
Patriarch
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wrote:

Some is pressed, some is made through a roller process (usually lower grades). The pressed stuff has faces and four edges, the rolled stuff has variation between warp and weft edges as well.
MDF will take screws in an edge, if you pre-drill and use a parallel threaded woodscrew (not a drywall or self-tapper). Chipboard (particleboard) is garbage however you treat it.
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A 1" board lstarts as a 24" mat of fibre pulp before compression so i suggest if there is an endgrain it is the edge. So someone has put a screw into the edge of a board. As to fixing the break up of said board i use superglue thin and cramp flat before setting. The hole invariable closes and insert screw again.
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[snipperectomy]

Absolutely.
When I used to assemble case-goods, I used a 1/8" bradpoint bit in an air-drill and then used a 2" #8 'LOWROOT' screw. Aggressive threads, but skinny root. The drill bit is bigger than the root of the screw, even then, the shit will split sometimes. Its 'end-grain' is like a stack of wafers.... easily split apart.
The 'face grain', however, has the added benefit of there being much more surrounding material to allow some lateral pressure from the cutting screw threads. The particles are finer on the surface as well. But don't count on that near the edge... for obvious reasons.
Let's face it... the only redeeming factor is that PB is flat and cheap. A great material to use as a substrate for veneers and laminates and even melamine. A client of mine cut 2' x 2' panels from PB and 'tiled' his workshop floor with them... he edgebanded each tile with 3/8" oak strips. 3 coats of Fabulon and it looks like cork. A great, cheap floor.
..ran out of tea...gone
0?0
Rob
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OK an anology forthwith. Like putting a screw into the front of book or into the side (between pages). Compressed board=paper - so neat.
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Robatoy wrote:

Any problem with moisture absorption? Was the oak just decorative, or ? That would make a cheap floor covering.
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