Is there a tool

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that one can stick over the protruding end of a dowel that spins, and returns the dowel to original size? This one has goo and gunk all over it. Or is this a hand job? I have a Foredom, and razor knife, and can do a decent job. Just wondered if there is a specific tool for this.
Steve
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I'd think that driving the dowel through a dowel plate would work... e.g., http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp 39
John
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BTW, it wouldn't be too difficult to make a dowel plate for occasional use for a single size... a drill of desired size and a chamfer bit applied to a piece of steel via a drill press. the L-N plates is intended to last and offer various sizes.
John
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On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 20:35:15 -0800, "Steve B"

Tenoners will do that, but they usually leave a radius on 'em. http://www.veritastools.com/products/Page.aspx?p 5
You can make or buy a rounding plane which will work all the way down to the flat. http://tinyurl.com/2wjeahh It's basically a hole in a piece of wood with a blade slightly protruding into it. You can make one with any plane blade (or a sharpened piece of metal for simple glue removal.)
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Steve B wrote:

A die and light sanding but why would you bother to reclaim a used piece of dowel?
--

dadiOH
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It's already cemented to the upright, and I thought it would be better than removing it and replacing. Or should I just remove and replace the whole thing? Drilling them out exactly is a crap shoot.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

I think so too. __________

Very true. If I have to do that I make an oversize hole and fill it with thickened epoxy so I have wiggle room to align the pieces.
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says...

Just to be clear, are you talking about a dowel that is currently in place in a finished piece and you need to reduce the size of it for some reason?
The advice I'm seeing seems to be assuming that you have the dowel separate from the workpiece.
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Yes, the dowel is half in the workpiece, with the nub sticking out. I thought that it would be better to dress up the nub than cut and drill out the whole piece, as drilling a true hole would be iffy.
Steve
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I may be missing the point, but it seems to make more sense to replace a dowel rather than invest too much time and effort in its restoration. The humble dowel is, after all, rather inexpensive. Most of the solutions offered here seem to be using a canon to kill a fly.
Joe G
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wrote:

I may be missing the point, but it seems to make more sense to replace a dowel rather than invest too much time and effort in its restoration. The humble dowel is, after all, rather inexpensive. Most of the solutions offered here seem to be using a canon to kill a fly.
Joe G
I am a rank newbie. So, is it better for me to pull/dig/drill/cut out the dowel that is firmly in place and replace it? Seems to me that I would want to save the part that is firmly attached, and somewhat finished without gouging a new hole. The part of the chair is the upright, so it would be difficult/impossible to get it up to my big drill press and drill a true hole. Same with hand held DeWalt drill. I just thought that the existing dowel is oriented correctly, glued into the upright solid, and was looking at the best way to dress the full length nub prior to regluing and reassembly.
Steve
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On 12/31/10 11:49 AM, Steve B wrote:

Like you said, you're a rank newbie.... with a drill press? :-)
If you're new to woodworking, you may think drilling it out and replacing it may be difficult. One more experienced might recognize it's probably easier and perhaps more effective to drill it out and replace it. Bottom line is you need to do what you're comfortable doing.
Any number and/or combination of things such as sandpaper, rasp, files, chisels, etc., could clean up the end of the dowel in not much time at all, even for a rank newbie.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

New development. Upon cleaning the joint, I found the end of a pin nail protruding out the side of the dowel, but not enough to grab it. Had I gone in with a drill bit, it would not have been good. So, I cleaned the protruding dowel, may put a pin nail in the new joint into the protruding dowel or not. Just have to see how sturdy it is. The chair is one with those two piece side arms that is weak from the start. Dowel at the start, at the 90 down, and at the end that joins to the seat.
Steve
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On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 20:35:15 -0800, "Steve B"

Based on your other explanation that the dowel is stuck in something I guess you mean the tool covers the dowel, and spins around the dowel and cleans it. I haven't heard of such a tool.
Depending on what the goo and gunk consists of, it might soften with some heat, or vinegar, and be easily scraped off.
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On 12/31/2010 12:51 PM, Jim Weisgram wrote:

Sandpaper is the tool.
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Jack
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wrote:
[...snip...]

I'd suggest avoiding sandpaper unless you have to. Depending on how hard the glue/gunk is, you might end up removing too much wood and then the dowel wouldn't fit as well in the new joint. If that happens, glue with epoxy, maybe adding microballoons.
If you can soften and remove the glue without removing wood, you will likely have a stronger final joint.
If I couldn't soften the glue, then I'd try a card scraper before I'd use sandpaper, again trying to not remove too much wood.
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I would use a utility blade pocket knife and perhaps a 1/2 inch chisel for places the knife could not reach. Good practice to control these tools on a job like that.
--
Jim in NC


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On 12/30/2010 10:35 PM, Steve B wrote:

Heh heh. He said "hand job". Heh heh.
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Hey, what happens in the shop stays in the shop.
Steve
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On 12/31/10 12:15 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

You started the NYE celebrations a little early this year?
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