Is there a difference btw a Finish nail gun and Brad nail gun?

Thinking about getting a air nail gun /compressor combo. I've seen some called air guns called finishing nail Gun and Brad nail Gun. Looking at the actual nails there doesn't seem to be any differences. Are they actually different or just different names for same guns ?. Looking on the ends of the gun some may be a bit cumbersome to precise nailing (wide point) on exact spot than others any comments on best one?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9 Sep 2004 10:07:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (dteckie) wrote:

BIG difference. A brad is no more than a skinny clamp to hold wood together until the glue dries. A 15 ga finishing nail is a real nail with actual holding power on it's own.

I don't have the best, I have the Bostitch 15 ga angle oil free nailer and I love it. I've heard that hitting another nail head on can break it but I'm at about 1000 nails driven with no problems at all so far. I drive mostly 2.5 inch big boys. If you go finishing nailer get an ANGLE nailer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (dteckie) wrote in

There are:
Pin nailers - 23 gauge, shorter lengths, headless, designed for very small mouldings, etc. Should not cause splitting. Specialized tool. Estimate $150 and up - don't quote me on this - not including compressor. Without heads, some contend that the entry holes are invisible, and there is no putty or filling needed. I wouldn't know from personal experience.
Brad nailers - 18 gauge, although there are 16 gauge, brads. 1/2" to 2- ish+ " brads. Small heads. Chisel points. Lots of competitors. I bought a package deal from Porter Cable, then added a nailer to shoot longer brads, and a narrow crown stapler that I haven't used too much yet. I learned from personal experience that shooting 2"+ 18 ga brads is a dicey business, but that small wound healed.
Finish nailers - Typically 15 ga., heads more like finish nails. Substantial holding power. More weight in the tool. Larger size. Less for furniture work, and more for finish carpentry and trim work, although there is substantial overlap in application. Porter Cable has/recently had a combo kit with compressor, 18 ga brad nailer and 15 ga finish nailer, available at the home centers for $300. My neighbor bought the kit, and thought it a really good deal.
If you need super precision, you need the smaller, finer gauge, but you give up holding power (but you typically have an adhesive.) The 15 ga nailer has all the precision you need for crown or base or trim, and is used by most of the pros.
Hope this helped.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Explanations have already been given for the differences. I have a 15 ga. and 18 ga. nailer as well as a narrow-crown stapler. I have two friends who have the same 16 ga. nailer for loan. Generally the 18 ga. is for very thin trim where splitting might be an issue OR in conjunction with glue joints. Very light tool. 15 ga. and 16 ga. are for normal trim and crown molding where greater length of fastener (and diameter) are needed to support the additional weight. Stapler for cabinet backs as well as the thicker side of door and window trim in a house. Use galvanized fasteners for outdoor use.
What tools will you be replacing with the nailer/bradder/stapler? Typically only the 15 ga. nailer magazine is angled, the others are usually straight.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (dteckie) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you sure??? When I see "Finish Nailer" - I think 16g. Brad Nailers, I think 18g.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (dteckie) wrote in message

Thanks to all for the information. Much appreciated. Always a plus being informed prior to purchase.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.