Is spruce worth anything?

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Humbug. The SPF designation means that they have pretty much the same engineering properties. A hemlock is easily distinguished from fir tree,even 100 feet away. The branches sag and the needles are a mix of lengths which give the tree a kind of lacy look. Up close it is easy to tell the difference. Grab a branch with your bare hand and if it is stickery it is a spruce, if soft a fir.
As for the wood, it is all over the place depending on species especially among the firs.
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I wonder if that's what the BORGs sell as "white wood" now... I've noticed that they don't sell pine shelving any more, just "white wood" whatever that is..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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mac davis wrote:

Like "white fish", an undifferentiated lot of species w/similar properties/appearance...
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There is but _one_ whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis, and the best are from Lake Superior, where the cold water makes their flesh firm and tasty.
"White wood" out east can include hemlock, about which many here appear confused. Used to mean (true) poplar in our area until the westerners started selling aspen.
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George, I would (wood) never think of hemlock as "whitewood" cause I have about 15 acres of it here in the Catskills. When I mill it, the color is definitely not like the color of SPF. It's more brownish and reddish. It may be included in SPF, but I've not seen any. We have a garbage wood up here called 'poplar' it's not good for much. It definitely does not look like hemlock. Hemlock is an evergreen and this stuff looks like it wants to be a birch in another 30 or 40 thousand years. Regards, Hank
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Henry St.Pierre wrote:

The American Softwood Lumber Association has a "hem-fir" species group, typically Western hemlock and true fir. That group is a step up in strength from "SPF", but below Southern yellow pine (SYP) and Doug Fir (DF) Most of the Home Despot lumber in Suburban Wasington DC appears to be hem-fir.
--

FF


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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Not here. Whitefish is a specific game fish. Not a fisherman and don't know what the species is.
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

"white" fish, <not> "whitefish"...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Yeah, I know, but I just had to point out that whitefish is a specific, and if you hear someone say it, you really don't know what they mean.
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

I got to thinking I don't recall that I've seen the generic labeling recently--maybe that disappeared w/ some of the fair marketing laws, I don't know...
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toller wrote:

SPF Two by fours -- other wise known as Spruce - Pine - Fir Tubafours.
Used in house construction, ships masts etc.
Light, strong, lots of resin sometimes. Spruce gum is nice and so is spruce beer -- made from the resin...
Used in guitar tops (musical grade -- requires tight grain), mantels for fireplaces etc.
Nicest spruce I ever saw was in the columns of a fireplace mantel/millwork -- it had been painted many times -- the last time orange -- with yellow flames. I did not have the time to strip -- I threw it out with tears in my eyes.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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"WillR" wrote in message

Red spruce is highly prized for this and hard to come by these days. A good piece vibrates like a tuning fork when struck ... tapping a red spruce log laying on the ground can actually produce a ringing note.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/07/05
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toller wrote:

;-) Glen
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Glen wrote:

No, he didn't. The name "Spruce Goose" was a complete misnomer.
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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com wrote:

Sitka spruce has a good weight to strength ratio and has been widely used in _other_ aircraft. In fact, one of the largest suppliers of parts and kits for homebuilt aircraft goes by the name of _Aircraft Spruce_.
Another wood commonly used in aircraft, a small boatload of which WAS used in the Hughes Hercules (aka "Spruce Goose") is birch. Aircraft birch is commonly used as plywood. Aircraft birch 3-ply plywood can be as thin as 1/64". That's pretty impressive when you consider that the veneer commonly used to cover fine furniture is typically 1/48", substantially thicker than that plywood.
Priced by the sheet, the cheapest plywood seems to be around 1/8" thick. For plywood thinner than that, the price per sheet goes up as the thickness goes down.
--

FF


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Has anyone actually used it for woodworking?!
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toller wrote:

I'm sure someone has... :)
What do you have in mind? Something you would use a soft pine or similar for spruce would be a reasonable substitue.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Over the years -- yes -- shelves, boxes, furniture, construction...
Works like white pine -- these days.
Can have gummy patches (resin) -- but otherwise ok.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Over the years -- yes -- shelves, boxes, furniture, construction...
Works like white pine -- these days.
Can have gummy patches (resin) -- but otherwise ok.
------------- thanks. With oil on it, it actually rather pretty. Though it dents pretty easily.
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Straight grained Sitka Spruce is the desired choice for traditional wood spars {masts & booms}. The flexibility allows it to bend rather than break.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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