Is pine generally kiln dried?

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Hi. I have a chinchilla that gets loose once in awhile and he likes to chew on the frame of a futon couch (chins gnaw on wood constantly). I'm no expert but it looks like some of the slats in the back of the frame where he sits are pine. Pine can kill a chin unless it is kiln dried. Anything that has too much moisture or sap will do harm to these sensitive animals. Is it safe to say that any wood going into furniture is kiln dried?
thanks, dwhite
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I thought you had to be trolling; after all, once it has been used, there is no difference between kiln dried and air dried wood. So, being hooked, I did a google search and found you are almost right.
You can't let them chew on fresh pine. Pine in your futon frame is dry, not fresh. How it got dry does not matter.
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FALSE. Kiln-dried wood is brought to high temperatures during the drying process, which definitely produces chemical and physical changes in the wood.

This may or may not be true, depending on the specific nature of the danger to the critter from chewing on fresh pine. For example, it's possible (even likely) that the high temperatures of kiln drying cause chemical changes in the resin which result in reducing its toxicity. These changes would *not* occur during air drying, and thus air-dried pine might present the same hazards as fresh.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Not necessarily. Low temperature kiln's are used, although I would admit that it is unlikely that the softwood you buy from the borg was done that way; large scale drying of softwood is indeed often done at higher temperatures, soemthing like 180-240 F.
PK
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wrote:

I'd say it's unlikely the softwood you buy from the borg was ever in the same county as a kiln.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ Now we'll just use some glue to hold things in place until the brads dry +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Now having experienced said wood, I would be inclined to agree with you; however they *claim* it is kiln dried. Now you want wet, try the PT stuff; *that* is wet. 'round here, the decking cedar is also wet I think; major shrinkage and kinda messy to deal with.
PK
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Mark & Juanita wrote: ...

No, it certainly is kiln-dried, just to construction standards and rapidly, not to hardwood/furniture standards...if it were fresh cut undried it would definitely be much wetter.
You may be thinking of treated which will have residual non-natural moisture from the treating process...
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wrote:

No, I'm definitely thinking of what they pass for untreated 2 x 4 white wood down here (used to be pine, this is fir, doesn't smell like any evergreen I ever remember). I'll grant my comment was somewhat facetious, but the wood we get down here from the borg is still quite damp to the touch. If one does not use it immediately to constrain it or constrain it in storage, it will twist as it dries.
As I said, my kiln comment was somewhat facetious, but the drying that is done is just barely construction quality
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ Now we'll just use some glue to hold things in place until the brads dry +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Sounds like SPF (spruce, pine, fur) borg stuff... The last time I bought some, which was between Christmas and New Years I had to break the wood apart in the store as it was frozen together! I don't know how long the unit was inside the store but about a quarter of the 2x4s were missing off the top of the stack when I got there. I was very glad I brought my leather work gloves in as it was a terrible job getting them apart. Reminds me of the "old days" of the 70s when I bought wood that was stored outside in the winter... the big dimension stuff wasn't even under cover!
John
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white
any
Don't know about borg ............. but even down here in LA which is southern pine country they use Brazilian pine to pressure treat. It is cheaper than the trees just outside the gate. The stuff comes in full of mold spores and now that CCA (copper-chrome-arsenic) is banned they have hell keeping it from turning black in storage. Business has really picked up for the company that I work for - one of our products is moldacide.
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Hmmm... moldacide goes pretty good with my typo above too... fur vs. fir. ;-)
John
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Such as? Can you give me some examples?

A number of websites said "pine" (no descriptive) was okay for cages, but "kiln dried pine" shavings had to be used for bedding. Another website said that "fresh pine" was dangerous. Presumably one might, without the caution, use "fresh pine" for bedding but not for construction; as that is alway dried in some manner.
My conclusion that "fresh pine" is dangerous, but "dried pine" is okay without distinction as to the drying method. No?
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toller wrote: ...

Impossible to say from that detailed analysis... :)
I'd guess the only problem would be a sizable ingestion of "fresh" resin-laden material as would most likely only be likely w/ the bedding owing to the smaller initial size.
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Sure. Here's one that's been discussed here several times. Kiln-dried black walnut is dark brown; air-dried black walnut is dark brown with a distinct purple cast that is utterly absent in kiln-dried walnut. The difference is due to temperature-induced chemical changes in the wood.

If your own research shows that "kiln dried pine shavings had to be used for bedding" why would you suppose that the drying method makes no difference? That conclusion, even though possibly correct, is *obviously* unsupported by the evidence you have cited so far.

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

...
...
Not necessarily so...the purple cast <can> come through kiln drying (I have some on hand), but not if the kiln steams it to blend in the the sapwood color...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Kiln-dried black

distinct
difference is due

(I
Bass akwards. The 'purple' (looks more like grey to me) cast is caused by kiln drying and will not appear in air-dried wood. I'm pretty sure that steaming to blend the color in from the heartwood to the sapwood greatly increases the effect. IMHO, it looks like crap.
I've seen plenty of air-dried black walnut--dried it ourselves. The first time I saw steamed black walnut I didn't even recognize it. My second question was "What happened to it?"
I've read here on the rec that the discoloration from steaming fades over time so that in the long run it will look OK.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote: ...

No, the purple color is caused by soil types where the individual tree grew...I'm not sure that anyone has identified specific minerals, pH, or other conditions required, but it is an inherent trait of black walnut, not induced by kiln drying. It is certainly observable in some air-dried specimins.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

tree
or
walnut,
Hmm, now I'm going to have to take some walnut ans steam it in my oven to see what happens.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

In general, the steaming promotes the migration of color to sapwood although it also promotes blending and makes a more general brownish hue. I was told by the fella' running the kiln in VA where I used to buy that the commercial users (that area is, or at least was, full of furniture manufacturers) demanded it and that for their purposes, the high temperature and extensive steaming essentially washed all the red and purple hues out. He would normally dry in a smaller kiln for the private market and not steam...I know from first-hand experience that that would still contain some of the purple tints although I suspect if they were compared to a side-by-side slab of the same tree, the air-dried would still be more pronounced in color--never saw that experiment.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Don't you have that backwards?
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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