Is MDF board good for cabinets

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I am wanting to build some cabinets for my garage and want to u 1/2 and 3/4 mdf board. Is that good wood to use?
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No.
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Can u tell me what is a good wood then Leon wrote:

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Pine. Jim
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On 24 Nov 2006 19:55:23 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

Cabinet-grade plywood will work. Actually, most hardwoods will be fine, try to avoid softwoods as they will not stand up to hard use over time.
Can you tell us why you think 'u' is a word in the English language?
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Thanks for everyones help so far. Hey Brian why do u have to be so mean. I was half asleep when tying the post. Everyone makes mistakes Brian Henderson wrote:

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On 25 Nov 2006 04:46:22 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

Some coffee might hit the spot right now.
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Chuck Taylor
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I don't think he was being mean, he was simply pointing out that your insipid shorthand is annoying.
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Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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What did u tie it 2?
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On 25 Nov 2006 04:46:22 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

There's nothing mean about pointing out that, in a text communications environment, it's important to use proper English spelling and grammar.
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Thanks for all the help so far and sorry if I almost started a flame war Brian. My garage is climate controlled so humidity is not an issue here. Gonna go to Home Depot Monday I think and look at the cabinet plywood. Brian Henderson wrote:

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On 26 Nov 2006 00:31:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

Better idea, find an actual lumber supplier in your area and avoid Home Depot/Lowes. You'll get much better prices and much better quality that way.
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 19:14:38 GMT, Brian Henderson

Possibly. It was interesting when our Home Depot first opened and I was building my work shop their prices on construction lumber was on par ( a bit lower ) with the local lumber supply places but the quality was FAR superior. HD was selling an Alberta product that appeared to be at least a grade above the competitions BC lumber. The HD 2x6 and 2x4s were perfect.
But few months later their lumber quality went down hill and now appears to be of worse quality than the stuff carried by other local suppliers.
Right now Home Hardware has the good stuff. I actually found a lift of 2x4 and 1x6 spf that actually had pine and fir in the lift. The yard guy let me hand select my 1x6s but would not allow me to hand select the studs. Studs could only be refused if they were defective because customers were ripping stacks apart for the fir. So I came home with a lot of great almost clear 1x6 pine and some fir at construction grade prices.
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 11:38:24 -0800, jimmy wrote:

The thing is, there are two kinds of lumber yards, softwood yards and hardwood yards. Home Depot is a softwood yard (to the extent that it's a lumberyard at all)--they have a limited supply of hardwoods at not very attractive prices--this is not specific to Home Depot but generally true of softwood yards. Find a hardwood yard and you'll find hardwoods at a lower price and with vastly better selection. They also are not culturally uniform--some are set up mostly as wholesale yards, others are mostly retail, some cater to specific fields, and so on. Generally they sell lumber and plywood and not much else. They also tend not to have Web sites, although this is changing--your best bet for finding them locally is the Yellow Pages.
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--John
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I'd not even call it wood, just a composite board. It has a place in life, but not for cabinets. Over time it can sag, war, hinges pull out, etc. Plywood, or low cost wood like pine is OK too. Or a combination of the two.
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I'd use plywood. It is stable, strong, readily available, easily worked and can be finished in a variety of ways. MDF produces too much dust when you cut it and its corners and edges are susceptible to damage after small bumps. Ply will not disintegrate when small amounts of water are spilt on it.
Mekon
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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

A quick note, aside from wood you have to consider what you intend on using them for. If you're using them for multiple tasks (storage, workbench) then you may need a combination of materials. If you're using them to store solvents or flammables you may even need vented metal. You may need drawers or the ability to add drawers or shelves to them. A good 'look before you leap' assessment goes a long way in ensuring you have something that gives you the most bang for the buck. You may be able to get away with some Pine 2x4's, nails and MDF tops or may need something much more elaborate. I think the reply, MDF not being a good material, is really with the understanding of it as a vertical support material and it's screw holding ability (which it sucks at for both), it's difficulty in milling (easily milled aside from the handling weight, but the dust is potentially hazardous to your health and really stinks up the garage). Also, when it gets wet it's useless (i.e. dimensionally unstable) and if you spill anything on it like oil it looks terrible.
On the other hand, for a solid flat surface it works well when covered up with something like hardboard or laminate. I wouldn't span it over to great a length because it's weight will likely make it sag. In most cases, a good 3/4 ply or 3/4 ply + pine combination works well, is inexpensive and easy to aquire as well (Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.). The only trick is knowing how to work with sheet goods. Typically a good cutting plan will help as you can get most home improvement stores to make a few cuts for free.
If you intend on building cabinets that may also double as workstations I'd consider reading Danny Proulx's book, 'Building Workshop Workstations' (which I found very helpful/insightful) or other books you might be able to check through at the library.
Hope this helps.
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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

That is fine for cabinets. You may want to reinforce the top and bottom with a 1 x 2 strip and put a good coat of paint or a clear sealer to make it easier to clean.
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Today's MDF is much better than 20-30 years ago. If your furniture's are going to be stored or used in a control environment where the temperature is ambient all the time MDF is fine. However if your are going to build cabinets for your unheated garage and intent to keep them for a long time I do not recommend this material. Unless, after the cabinets are completed you first prime them and apply a good quality paint. The longevity of this material is subject to where you reside. I live near the Eastern coast and the humidity and temperature vary a lot in my unheated garage. The top of my radial arm saw is made with MDF and stored in my garage. Not a big deal but after 15 years the top is starting to disintegrate and needs to be replaced. The room cabinets that I have build for my three children 20 years ago with MDF are fairing out good. Only the unpainted area of the MDF located in the back and sides of the cabinets are starting to show sign of disintegration. Let put it this way It will not hold a wood or metal screw too well? At the time, we had three kids and they needed room furniture and MDF did served me fairly
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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

Flex your latent woodworker muscle a little. Look into paint-grade maple plywood. 3/4" is about 15 dollars per sheet more than MDF... at Home Despot. Finish the edges with a poplar face-frame. Just nail them on with Titebond III and paint. Fill the nail-holes if you must. (I suggest a 15 or 16 gauge nail if you're so equipped.. but a 2" 18 gauge will hold reasonably well in the plywood I'm thinking of.)
With the cost of material around here, that is IMHO, the biggest bang for the buck. Make a gang of manageable sized cabinets, optimizing the dimensions you can rip out of a 4 x 8 and create boxes you can move, filled with stuff, to another arrangement. Go modular. Don't make really big cabinets.
To make MDF reasonably water resistant, you're doing a whole lot of sealing, sanding and painting.. and those edges are sponges... You don't want to go there...besides everything they told you in here is true..stuff is dusty and heavy and smells bad.
r
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