Is it worth having multiple machines?


When I initially got into woodworking, I stocked up on delta's finest benchtop tools from the local borg. Some died and early death, others proved acceptable. Presently, I'm on the verge (ha! have been for two years now) of buying half a dozen machines from grizzly, partially new additions, partially to replace the bench top models. So my question is this. Should I unload the older, smaller machines?
For example, I recently bought a floor-standing variable speed behemouth from delta to replace the relatively good if slightly underpowered benchtop DP. If shop space and money wern't really a big deal, would you keep the benchtop DP? My immediate reaction is that it would be nice to have a second setup sometimes. And it might be worth more to me as an extra machine than what I could get for it on ebay. I have a dedicated mortiser, so there's no worry about the attachment. I'm just not sure if or when I would ever need a second setup.
Similarly, I have a lunchbox delta planer. It has served me well. But should I keep it? I can't imagine needing portability. I doubt anyone would want to borrow it unlike maybe the cheap miter saw. Maybe as a sacraficial lamb (instead of the good knives in the big iron) when I find that hidden stash of gritty barn wood? Since it's ear-splitting and I don't have the dust hood, I know i'll avoid using it.
Then longer term, there's the contractor's table saw. After the other machines are in hand, I can see wanting that grizzly 12" table saw. Does anyone have two table saws and use them both? Now this is an area where I can see wanting multiple setups. But maybe it's not worth the space? What do you think?
brian
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brianlanning wrote:

house in NC. Set this planer on the stand and let him find out why sometimes it's a bad idea to salvage some things. It's been my experience that anything you put in your lunchbox is something you might have to eat some day.

Doesn't everybody have 2 ??
Tom in KY, with 1500sq.ft. of wall to wall fun.
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Shopsmith. Of course they are in three different locations and one may as well not be mine as I haven't seen it for a while (rockwell contractor saw I loaned to a friend when I bought my unisaw in '99).
Now I just need more wall to wall fun where I live.
Gary
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"GeeDubb" wrote in message

I'd settle for a little more distance between the walls.
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If space isn't an issue I would definitely consider keeping the second drill press. If you need to do a number of holes with counterbores it would be nice to set up one drill with each size bit and not have to keep swapping. Same with countersinking. Or, assuming your new drill doesn't come with electonic variable speed control, you might want to keep the old drill set up at different speed than the other one so you don't have to mess with the belts just to make a few holes in some oddball material.
Lee
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The new drill is the cheaper variable speed DP from delta. (norm has the expensive one) The VS feature isn't electronic. There's a contraption in the head that changes the diameter of the pullies while the motor is running. There's a big dial on the front.
That's not a bad idea. I could dedicate the drill press to a common bit (counterbore) and never change the bit. Kind of the the crazy people who have one router for each router bit. :-)
brian
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wrote:
Kind of the the crazy

who you callin crazy? :-]>
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wrote:

Some of them. Small band saws, drill presses, and jointers are pretty useless if you have standard sized models.
Having a 14" and a 24" band saw can be a good thing. The same can not be said for an 8" and 14".

Nope.
Got hand drills?

I'd keep this until it dies. While they can't take as big a cut as a stationary machine, lunchbox planers are INCREDIBLY useful machines. They also leave a better surface than most big 'urn, but they can't plane more than say, 12". if you really think you'll really need a 15 or 20" planer sell it, but I wouldn't. I've lived for a long time with a 12.5" DeWalt, and still rarely yearn for bigger.

Yeah, but I'd sell the saw for the right price.
Otherwise, I'd build an outfeed table that incorporates both saws into nearly the space of one, back to back.
Barry
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Yeah, but I sort of hate hand drills. Although I really like the new impact driver.
My main motivation for a larger planer is better dust collection and quieter operation. I'd also like the ability to run boards though at an angle.
For the table saw I was thinking of doing what you describe, putting them back to back. I paid about $900 for the saw a ways back. I doubt I could get half of that now since they're all chinese. It's probably still worth more to me as a second saw. Still, that would pay for one of the other machines I'm after.
brian
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If $ wasn't really a big deal I'd just buy everything I wanted whether I needed it or not. This is definitely not the case so I'd turn them into what I don't have.
2nd TS? This is the most valuable keeper of the lot. Permanently set it up with a dado blade. Or turn it into a disk sander.
2nd lathe? Turn it into a sanding station with 2 disks, one outboard and 1 inboard, with different grits. Or an inboard horizontal spindle/drum sander.
2nd DP? Drum sander. Sharpening station with a really slow speed grinding wheel.
Art

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wrote:

Depends on what you do with them. If they just sit there completely unused gathering dust and you can't imagine any project that would ever call for them, then sure, sell them to someone else who might get some enjoyment out of them.
But if you're going to be kicking yourself in 6 months because the old machine would have been perfect for what you need to do, pack them away.
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That's the thing. I don't want to sell a tool, then come up with some cool use for it in six months. For example, I remember seeing a setup where someone put their bench top DP on it's side and used it as a small lathe somehow. Turning doesn't really interest me at the moment, except for maybe turning pens. I guess I was hoping someone would metion some cool use they have for older/smaller machines that I hadn't thought of.
brian
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wrote:

ive got 2 DP one is set up for drilling pen blanks most of the time. it also is nice having the extra DP when i have one set up for somthing special like maybe boring cabinet doors for blum hinges and i need to drill some holes for something else. also have a second tablesaw for when i got the dado set on the uni and need to cut something else quick. im not even gonna get into the multiple router debate right now! lol... 2 band saws is great to. dont have to change the resaw blade for a few cuts on another project. i would keep em all if possible.
skeez
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wrote:

Chances are, you won't find them, and the DP as a lathe thing really isn't a very good idea anyhow. If you decide that you want to turn somewhere down the line, go get yourself a decent lathe. Use the money you're going to get from selling the tools you have now. :)
Realistically, there probably isn't much you can do with benchtop tools that you can't do with a larger version.
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True enough, but consider, if you have the room, how convenient it would be to have a drum mounted on one DP for sanding, and bits on the other.
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