Is horse chestnut wood good for anything?

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It looks like we are going to have to a large horse chestnut tree taken out. Is the wood good for anything?
If so, who might want it?
The trunk is about 2-3 feet across near the bottom. It looks like there might be some interesting burl-like pieces in several places.
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snipped-for-privacy@e.mcc wrote:

None of the tree books I have that describe Horsechestnut say anything about the properties of the lumber, but they do say that it's an "introduced" member of the Buckeye family, native to Asia and southeastern Europe. However, "The Encyclopedia of Wood" by the U.S. Department of Agriculture has this to say about Buckeye:
=======Buckeye consists of two species, yellow buckeye (Aesculus octandra) and Ohio buckeye (a. glabra). These species range from the Appalachians of Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina westward to Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Buckeye is not customarily separated from other species when manufactured into lumber and can be used for the same purposes as aspen (Populus), basswood (Tilia), and sapwood of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera).
The white sapwood of buckeye merges gradually into the creamy or yellowish white heartwood. The wood is uniform in texture, generally straight grained, light in weight, weak when used as a beam, soft, and low in shock resistance. It is rated low on machinability such as shaping, mortising, boring, and turning.
Buckeye is suitable for pulping for paper; in lumber form, it has been used principally for furniture, boxes and crates, food containers, wooden ware, novelties, and planing mill products. ======= Based on all that, I don't think I would bother having it milled...
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Steve Turner wrote:

it is. You mention Aspen along with Poplar. Poplar is reasonably hard while aspen is much like basswood.
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"Steve Turner" wrote:

Don't know about the DofA definition, but in Ohio a Buckeye is defined as a worthless nut.
OSU fans not included.<grin>
Lew
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On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 03:26:11 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

I'm an OSU graduate and I witnessed plenty of nuts along High Street, especially after beating Michigan in football. Woody Hayes was a nut of another kind, all by himself. The buckeyes are very good for dropping down crawdad holes.
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"Phisherman" wrote:

Have two sons that are both OSU graduates.
Love that bumper sticker you see in Columbus:
Directions to Ann Arbor, North till you smell it, West till you step in it.
If you travelled north west Ohio during football season as I did, you best not go into a restaurant or bar before you found out if it was a Buckeye or Wolverine establishment.
They take their college football very seriously.
Lew
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On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 21:57:53 -0500, Steve Turner

I don't want it myself. I used to do a little woodworking, but not anymore. I just thought I'd see if is worth offering it to anyone.
It sounds like it is too soft for most uses.
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On Mar 17, 3:14am, snipped-for-privacy@e.mcc wrote:

I'm on here late, but as far as I can tell, almost no wood is too soft or too hard but what some woodworker can't use it for something, even if it's firewood in the stove. I've got bits of an old Chinese chestnut here that are good for turning, eventually, and two friends who are good turners.
Check around locally for people you know who are woodworkers. If you can't find any, check the shop teachers at your local HS for some names.
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 12:28:39 -0700 (PDT), Charlie Self

I wish I had thought of the local high schools. Too late now. It's all gone to the chipper.
It might not have been much good anyway. The reason we had to take it out was that it had serious root damage and started leaning. The tree guy showed me some of the cross sections. The damaged wood went pretty far in. He said the tree had been badly pruned for many years.
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snipped-for-privacy@e.mcc wrote:
... snip

What kinds of things make up "badly pruning"? I have to admit that I don't have a really good feel for pruning well and would like to make sure that I don't do something that would irreparably damage any of the few trees that we have growing here.
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If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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wrote: : > It looks like we are going to have to a large horse chestnut tree : > taken out. Is the wood good for anything? : > : > If so, who might want it? : > : > The trunk is about 2-3 feet across near the bottom. It looks like : > there might be some interesting burl-like pieces in several places. : : None of the tree books I have that describe Horsechestnut say anything : about the properties of the lumber, but they do say that it's an : "introduced" member of the Buckeye family, native to Asia and : southeastern Europe. However, "The Encyclopedia of Wood" by the U.S. : Department of Agriculture has this to say about Buckeye: : : =======: Buckeye consists of two species, yellow buckeye (Aesculus octandra) and : Ohio buckeye (a. glabra). These species range from the Appalachians of : Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina westward to Kansas, Oklahoma, : and Texas. Buckeye is not customarily separated from other species when : manufactured into lumber and can be used for the same purposes as aspen : (Populus), basswood (Tilia), and sapwood of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron : tulipifera). : : The white sapwood of buckeye merges gradually into the creamy or : yellowish white heartwood. The wood is uniform in texture, generally : straight grained, light in weight, weak when used as a beam, soft, and : low in shock resistance. It is rated low on machinability such as : shaping, mortising, boring, and turning. : : Buckeye is suitable for pulping for paper; in lumber form, it has been : used principally for furniture, boxes and crates, food containers, : wooden ware, novelties, and planing mill products. : =======: : Based on all that, I don't think I would bother having it milled... : : --
If it's that similar to basswood, someone who does a lot of carving or whittling might be interested in it.
Len
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I've never done any woodworking with it -- but it makes *damn* good firewood. If you're anywhere near Indianapolis, I'd be happy to take it for that purpose.
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On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 13:29:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

About 2,000 miles away ;-) We're not allowed to burn anything in fireplaces around here. :-(
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Maybe you can buy some carbon credits from some third world country that has a good allocation from the new world government but has no infrastructure yet to generate much carbon on their own. Zimbabwai or Nambia come to mind, they could use the cash.
Oh wait, Obama hasn't had his cap-and-trade and world government budget passed yet. Maybe next year.
On Mar 17, 9:50am, snipped-for-privacy@e.mcc wrote:

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On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 10:01:36 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

And your plan is what? I suppose you would have voted for Bush again.
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Nucular Reaction wrote:

My plan is to agree with everything Obama says or does because thank God he isn't Bush. Yep, that's my plan....
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On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 17:05:00 -0500, Steve Turner

I agree. Bush was the worst president ever. Just not being Bush is a huge improvement.
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I am not a Bush defender, I am a tax hater and a liberty lover.
I think it really sucks that governments just pick a thing and tax it. This cap-and-trade crap will tax our industries into the ground while China and others not only keep freely trashing our planet but also sell credits from the regions of wasteland where they haven't developed any industry yet.
Maybe our government will start taxing the generation of sawdust of various species because until we woodworkers liberate it from it's storage in a board where it is safely compressed and kept from becoming an irritant to some people it is of no harm. But once we have expanded it into sawdust, we should pay a tax to offset the cost to society for our injurious behavior.

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wrote:

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basilisk wrote:

Build long-life, non-polluting passive solar heating panels to generate carbon credits to offset your sawdust taxes. Build engines that run on sunshine and you should be able to swim in carbon credits.
Where do I get mine? Is there a long line? :o)
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