Is glue safe for cedar plank on the BBQ?

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I have some smaller pieces of scrap (aromatic) cedar that I'd like to glue up to make planks large enough for cooking fish on the grill. The way I typically use these planks is to line the bottom of the plank with foil, place the planked fish on the second level over medium heat of a gas grill (@ 350-400 inside the hood) for around 20 min. The plank never chars, but can discolor from the heat on the bottom. The planks are reusable for about 20 trips to the grill or so.
Can thoroughly cured glue contaminate the fish in any way? I was thinking of using polyurethane, just because I have some left over, but otherwise Titebond II.
Glue Chemists encouraged to reply.
Thanks, H
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Can thoroughly cured glue contaminate the fish in any way? I was thinking of using polyurethane, just because I have some left over, but otherwise Titebond II.
You should not see any contamination as it is inert and non toxic when cured, but I don't know if the glues are good for the heat they will see.
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"hylourgos" wrote:

Ye gads, what an obvious troll, or at least I hope that is what it is.
Lew
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Wrong. But if the answer is so obvious to you, perhaps you'd care to share its rationale?
I won't hold my breath.
H.
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hylourgos wrote:

Not sure what this means, but every recipe I ever seen that uses cedar plank specifies untreated cedar plank.
"Untreated" doesn't include chemical treatment of any kind including glue.
Any urethane product contains MDI and/or TDI and this includes foam used in furniture or poly adhesive.
MDI and TDI are both full hazmat chemicals requiring self contained air supply masks (an air bottle strapped on your back or equal) if are are near the stuff.
You also need full hazmat suits.
These are both very nasty chemicals that we supply instrumentation for tanks that manufacturers use to contain it.
You want cedar planking, then use untreated cedar shake shingles which while very pretty, are also a real fire hazard.
Best use for them is planked food, not roofs.
Now take your meds like a good boy and go back to sleep.
Lew
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Hmmm, I've never seen Norm in a hazmat suit when doing a glue up. Now, I don't doubt the chemicals are hazardous in raw form and full concentration, but what happens when they are cured? MSDS sheets are good for raw chemicals, but they are of little or no value once the chemical has been processed, combined, cured, dried, whatever.
Ever notice that once wood is fully oxidized in becomes fireproof?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

A valid question.
MDI/TDI based products are perfectly safe when applied properly and allowed to cure.
When these cured products are burned; however, new ball game.
If you doubt this, talk to a local firefighter about what happens when furniture foam starts burning.
At a minimum, you will get SOX, NOX, CO and a whole bunch of other nasty organic products of combustion, be it complete or incomplete.
Urethanes are nothing to screw around with, they can be very nasty.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Treated cedar planks, FYI, have nothing to do with glue. And if you're trusting recipe guides to tell you whether glue is toxic, well....

Now that's helpful Lew, was that so hard? Why'd you have to go on about troll shit? You really think knowledge about acronyms like MDI/TDI is "obvious"?

That's Western Cedar you're referring to. It's also what many food sites suggest for meat planking, but if you'll read the OP more carefully, you'll realize it specified aromatic, i.e., Eastern Cedar, a whole different wood. The former, BTW, is frequently mentioned for its toxicity (both dust and oil), the latter is not.

Who is it, exactly, that you think you're talking to?
H.
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Amazing what a man can learn if he's half a mind to. Might leave you a bit shy, but bookmark this : http://www.acronymfinder.com /
Oh yes. For a bit more of an education, check the list of chemicals used by the tree for fighting decay. If they were put in a manufactured product, the label would be frightening.
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Thanks George, that's a great site for acronyms. Thus:
MDI: Methylene Diphenylene Diisocyanate TDI: Toluenediisocyanate
...correct?
Since you mention it, what chemicals are used by aromatic cedar for fighting decay?
H.
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At room temperature, I wouldn't be too worried, but putting this in the BBQ is another story. Checking the MSDS of a one-part moisture- curing polyurethane glue (not necessarily the one you are using) indicates that the following can be given off:
"By high heat and fire: carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, traces of HCN, MDI vapors or aerosols."
Would you like fries with that?
I've never been too keen on the trendy idea of using cedar for BBQing anything. Sure - just throw it on the stuff with natural bug killer in it - it'll shore taste goood! I'll stick to using aromatic cedar for chests and bug-proof closet lining.
Mike
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Meaningless. The MSDS is for the uncured adhesive. Once cured, the properties are entirely different. There is no MSDS for the cured product and none is required.
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The physical properties change, but the chemical components are the same. How do they react to heat? - not certain, but I bet the combustion (and partial combustion) byproducts are probably not much different. Since the OP isn't intending to subject the cured adhesive to very high, complete combustion conditions, he's likely to produce a similar collection of byproducts.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote: <snip>

Do you mean UNlikely?
Also, you wrote above: "I've never been too keen on the trendy idea of using cedar for BBQing anything. Sure - just throw it on the stuff with natural bug killer in it - it'll shore taste goood! I'll stick to using aromatic cedar for chests and bug-proof closet lining."
Using aromatic cedar for plank-fish cooking, although it may be considered a "trend" if you frequent haute cuisine places in the city, is hardly a novel idea--it's been done for centuries along the eastern coast.
Of course, maybe that's why there's so many crazy people down there....
Lots of edible things are natural bug repellants, such as citrus, but that hasn't kept most folks from enjoying it. Interesting question though (is aromatic cedar bad for you in this context), and funny that I hadn't considered that before the glue question.
Safety aside, however, I've never had anything remotely as good as cedar-planked fresh salmon. Just can't beat the taste.
Regards, H
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No - likely. If you are heating the glue without heating it enough to cause complete combustion, then you can generate incomplete combustion byproducts.

So too with smoking tobacco - I don't do that either, nor would I recommend it to others.

The Romans used lead salts as sweeteners. You can do what you want - I'm just saying there are things that aren't a good idea no matter what the taste.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

Ah, cleared it up, thanks.

I'm with you on the tobacco. But there is abundant and reliable scientific evidence for the dangers of smoking tobacco. Do you know of any reliable sources about aromatic cedar and cooking toxicity?

de salutate non disputandum est?
Good advice, thanks, H.
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Michael Daly wrote:

Ah, cleared it up, thanks.

I'm with you on the tobacco. But there is abundant and reliable scientific evidence for the dangers of smoking tobacco. Do you know of any reliable sources about aromatic cedar and cooking toxicity?

de salute non disputandum est?
Good advice, thanks, H.
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I'd be just as concerned with what might be in the "aromatic cedar". I've lined some closets with the it and it has some kind of crystaline looking stuff all over it.
I've been to some nice restuarants that served fish grilled on cedar planks. They looked more like roof shingles to me.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

Northwest Indians "grill" or broil salmon by tacking them the cedar board and standing the board up around the a fire. But they use western red cedar. I thing "aromatic cedar" refers to eastern woods. I would worry about using easter cedar, but worry even more about using glue. The plank should be solid.
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On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 05:32:26 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Landry's in Huntsville, AL (and probably other places) has cedar-planked Salmon. Come to you on a cedar shingle -- definitely *not* the old Army SOS. mmmm- good stuff. No, it's not the aromatic cedar.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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