Is A SawStop Table Saw Worth the Money

Page 6 of 7  


I'll restate that you have to be blind to not be intimidated by a blade spinning at 100 mph whether you know it is not going to cut you or not.
Brian however started this all off with the statement,,
Lots of us though have been doing this for decades and still have all our fingers and toes, just because we know what we're doing.
WHAT A LOAD OF CRAP.
People that know what they are doing, make mistakes and get hurt.
Slowly Brian has changed his comments that align a bit more with more sensible comments.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 18:27:14 GMT, "Leon"

That's why people like Norm and David Marks still have their fingers and toes, right? Neither of them uses a SawStop, do they?
Yes, what a load of crap. Gotcha.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You got squat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Henderson wrote:

Are the two mutually exclusive?
Bill
--
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 000750-2, 06/19/2007
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For Brian it seems to be. He just can't fully comprehend that "shit" happens and that it's impossible for it to happen to him. THAT'S arrogance at it's worst.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope, they don't have to be. As a matter of fact, they shouldn't be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do not know yore arrangement but rather than modify a saw to be lower, could you modify or build up the floor around the saw? If you have a wooden floor could you cut a hole in it and install a lower surface to set the saw into? Or perhaps build up the floor around equipment that is or is marginally too tall?
Just a thought.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is
Yes, raising the floor around the saw is usually a first suggestion, but it comes with it's own set of unique problems.
It virtually eliminates putting any tools so organized on mobile bases. That's a big problem unless one has a large shop to play with. Many cabinet table saws I've looked also have some type of mechanical component like a dust port near the base of the saw. In all fairness, there could be some advantages to a raised floor too, such as running dust collector tubing under a raised floor. Occasionally, I have been on raised wooded floors and truthfully, it's irritating. I feel the vibrations from rolling on such a floor whereas I'm infinitely more comfortable rolling on a flat, solid, hard unforgiving surface. I'm sure I'd feel much different if I was walking on these surfaces, but I'm not and never will be.
However, these things are not my biggest concern and that is the fact that I'd be rolling up and down little ramps depending where I was going and what I was doing. In 1987, I rolled down an 8" ramp with an elevation of 3" and tipped my wheelchair over. I broke both legs. To this day, I can remember the pain and months of aggravation from being in a wheelchair with casts on my legs. Ever since then I've always been terrified of doing the same thing again. Obviously, it's a personal paranoia that I have to deal with, so I intend to mitigate it by lowering a table saw rather than raising myself.
That's my explanation and I'm sticking to it. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rod & Betty Jo wrote: ...

You Presbyterian??? :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good questions, and I'll bring up some things to consider concerning other comments in this thread so please do not consider that all of these comments are directed at you.
This is the way I think concerning this topic.
Unfortunately my accident, which still seems like it only happed a few months ago, happened about 14 years prior to the SawStop being invented. Why don't I have one now? I am not in the market for a new TS. While many will say that the SawStop is very expensive and may not be worth the additional expense, it is marginally more expensive if you plan on buying a new saw any way. It may only be $500 to $1500 more than a "comparable" saw in the same class that you may be looking at. Yes $500 to $1500 is a lot of money to some people including myself. I do however pay a similar amount "every year" for home owners insurance and the chances of being hurt on the TS are much greater than my house burning down or being blown away in a storm. Damages incurred on a TS could be equal in value to those of your house being blown away or burned down and could be more if the injuries would affect your livelihood. If you do not need to buy a new saw the expense is much greater than what you were going to spend. I absolutely do not propose that every one go out and buy one. I do suggest that the saw be strongly considered if you are going to buy a new TS. It's like considering the purchase of a car with or with out air bags. Until you have been injured you really have not concept of how venerable you are. Once injured you have had the experience to realize that you simply do not know every possible way that you can be injured. It could not happen to me and yet it did. Every one that knows me was in shock because I was soooo careful. Hummmm.
You asked, if a any table saw accident is possible is it as well inevitable?
Absolutely. So far, Table saw accidents are not on the decline. Will you eventually get hurt, "maybe" not. Between you and 4 other TS users, the chances are 5 times greater that one of you will get hurt. We are all human and we make mistakes. With out fail we all eventually unknowingly let our guard down. The more you use your saw the more likely it is that at some time you are going to get hurt.
You always practice proper TS safety because you respect the machine and know what harm it can do. Are you more comfortable using the saw today than the very first day you used it? Do you think that you will become more comfortable with it as time goes by or if you use it every day? Thinking way back when your parents let you have your first knife, did you respect it and know what harm it could do? Are you more comfortable using the knife today than the very first time you used it? Have you ever cut yourself with a knife even though you had the knowledge that it could harm you.
You come from a long line wood workers. Your grandfather, your father, you and your child were and or will become woodworkers. Your grandfather's, your father's and your child's experience with woodworking equipment will never have any extended power or extend good luck to protect you from making a mistake. Your grandfather probably taught your father how to use and respect a knife. I'll bet your father has cut himself with a knife. Did you ever think that you would not cut your self because your father taught you how to handle and use a knife?
The simple fact is, the more safety features a tool has, the less likely an accident will occur when the inevitable happens. The inevitable would be you letting your guard down or making a mistake. The TS is unforgiving. It does not care whether you practice proper safety or not. You CANNOT know all the steps to prevent any possible accident and practice them 100% of the time.
If you are in the market for a new TS. Should you discount the SawStop because of they way the inventor tried to bring the saw/technology to market? :~) Before answering that question lets all remember that we all practice proper TS safety. Right? Do we let our guard down at this moment? Would not considering a saw with more safety devices because of the feelings we have towards some one or something be practicing good TS safety.
Practicing good TS safety does exclude events that happen when wood is not being cut.
Did you ever say or know some one that said, that will never happen to me?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Define "lots". Instead of expressing your slanted imagination, try presenting a real life figure such as percentage of owners who have experience misfires during *proper* usage and not when someone is screwing around that causes a misfire. Until you do that, your "lots" only adds up to your own faulty preceptions.

And of course, you're one of those people who have never had an accident because you're just to perfect in absolutely everything you do.
The Sawstop is not for people who are prone to accidents, it's for those times when the unexpected happens and it happens to everybody, except Brian Henderson of course. He's just too perfect in everything he does to have some type of accident.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would probably be a sure bet that the inventor had this particular personality in mind when he came up with the idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 5, 3:22 pm, Brian Henderson
...

Citation/statistics? I've seen nothing about excessively high Type I errors...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 5, 1:22 pm, Brian Henderson

Further, lots of people have reported false trips of the

Care to elaborate on where/who all these false trips are happening. Cartridge $70 (in some cases free from SS) $90 for WWII
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Howard Swope wrote:

Only if you can't seem to keep your fingers away from sharp spinning things.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"decided on getting the SawStophttp://www.sawstop.com /"
You guys must be swimming in cash! $400 for shipping? Geeze, I paid that for my saw!
Are you a hobbyist or setting up a professional shop?
My grandfather was the carpenter everyone would wait for, died with all ten fingers and left solid tools my uncle used till he died at eighty.
Richard Newell would have said "its a poor workman what blames 'is tools."
As to fingers, used a high quality carbide tipped blade, It will cut through flesh, bone and fingernails cleanly and quickly. You shouldn't feel a thing. Wrap them up in a clean towel with some ice before leaving for the emergency room and get a decent plastic surgeon or bone man. If you cut through the knuckle, the result is a stiff finger. Keep your head about you and drive carefully to the ER cursing your craftsman all the way - yeah, its the saws' fault!.
If you've $6,700 to blow on a hobby tool, go for the Multi-featured European tool and be "to careful" with it.
When you wake up the next morning and the Hospital Admin folks come to have you sign some papers, tell them to come back when you're off the anesthetics for 24 hours or so. (Lack of capacity to contract!) If you do sign anything that next day - call, fax and write a notice of revocation. Th hospital will try and get you to sign over your insurance to them FIRST and leave you to share the remainder with the surgical team, etc. Have your Insurance company wait until you have all the bills at hand and know all the players. Then, have them make the check out to you and everyone on that list. Then counter-sign the check and send it to them all c/o the Hospital with a letter offering it in full settlement.
If its cashed, that's that no more bills its all paid for! And not dime one out of your pocket.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is simply not true. Cleanly, absolutely not. Quickly, absolutely.
You shouldn't feel a thing.
You clearely are talking BS. Cut through bone and it feels like your whole arm is being electrocuted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tue, Jun 5, 2007, 12:40am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@hms3.com (HowardSwope) doth query: <snip> Thoughts, comments, advice?
Not worth it. You can't even cut salami without it stopping.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in (HowardSwope)

Now you know that's a load of balogna.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Howard,

.....> Thoughts, comments, advice?
Just heard from a local HS shop teacher - he's getting two of them. He gets a kickback accident ever so often (more rarely, due to his teaching skills and the many eyes in the back of his head, I'm sure), but he simply can not afford a possibility of an amputation accident.
I agree!
Go for it!
MJ Wallace
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.