Is A SawStop Table Saw Worth the Money

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I am getting ready to make a table saw purchase. I have pretty much decided on getting the SawStop http://www.sawstop.com /. It looks like a high quality saw and the safety features can't be beat. It is about double what I had originally wanted to spend. My thought was that if it prevents one injury it has easily paid for itself. An extra 2 grand seems like a lot of money until you weight it against the loss of a finger(s), and then that 2 grand seems like nothing.
Thoughts, comments, advice?
Thanks, Howard
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Got the money? Get the saw. Maybe a little overpriced till you need that instant stop!!! It is a very nice saw. Hopefully you'll never need the stop but it's there for piece of mind.
Tim

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What is the price of a finger ??
Jr
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/THENORTHCOASTPT
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Jerry - OHIO wrote:

It looks like somewhere around $2,500:
http://www.usatf.org/membership/benefits/groupInsurance.asp
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Got the money? Get the saw. Maybe a little overpriced till you need that instant stop!!! It is a very nice saw. Hopefully you'll never need the stop but it's there for piece of mind.
Tim

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As many would attest, I would strongly recommend it if you can afford it. Having lost half of my thumb 18 years ago on a TS that I had turned off, you can not be too careful. From most reports, everyone is happy with their purchase of the SawStop and it appears to be a top quality product.
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Damn, but that's the question of the century! I thought only an idiot could put their hand into a TS; then I nearly cut my finger off on a BS last year. Now I am not sure. (It has healed cosmetically perfectly, but still hurts at times.)
I think that all woodworking tools are dangerous. The solution is to be really careful using all of them; not to spend $2000 to make one safer. For instance, I now use push blocks when routing a rabbet on a picture frame, when a year ago I would have used my hands.
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Actually only an idiot thinks that it cannot happen to them.

And that is a good upgrade in the thought process of operating procedures but accidents often happen when there is no wood being processed. And I thought only an idiot could cut half their thumb off when not cutting wood. ;~)
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Me too. I put a "to-the-bone" notch in the end of a finger a few years ago with the saw's motor off. I flipped the switch off, started to walk away, and realized I had left a cut-off piece on the table. I carelessly overreached the still spinning blade and "bang"!
That's a hard hit when bone is involved. Very painful, but an invaluable lesson in safety. I am lucky, and a much more careful woodworker for it.
RonB
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Yeah, the bone being hit is pretty violent. I still remember how my whole hand shook as I cut it away from the tip of my thumb between the nail and the finger print up to the first joint. I also remember the nurse at the ER commenting "Knarly".
Unfortunately I was clueless what happened. I initially thought I had a kick back until I opened up my hand that was clutching my left thumb. I never could figure out what happened until I almost did it again about 1 year later. One year later I did the same thing, I finished cutting a through dado and turned the saw off. Then I reached with my left hand to the far end of the rip fence to lift it up and off the table top. This time however I felt the wind coming off of the dado set. Fortunately this time my thumb was too short to come in contact with the blade. Now I watch the blade come to a complete stop before making any adjustments.
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Damnit Leon... talk about wry and dry. "Fortunately this time my thumb was too short to come in contact with the blade."
I laughed so hard I almost fell out of the chair!
Thank Gawd you cut half your finger off long before so you were actually safe. It's a good thing; you coulda been hurt!!!!
Talk about being grateful for small favors...
Take 'em where you can get 'em, eh buddy?
I'm still laughing.
Robert
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wrote:

Yeah, yeah, that's uh, that's right. ;~)
No sense in grieving about what's done, might as well look on the bright side.
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Leon wrote:

[snip]
Not to mention those great deals on factory reject gloves! <g>
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I've always recommended that beginning woodworkers learn to "COUNT THE TEETH OF THE BLADE" before doing anything anywhere near it. I taught quite a few women over 6 years on safe power tool use and not one of us so much as got a scratch. I think this is a dumb kinda rule- but it works. Donna Menke, www.woodworks-by-donna.com, author: The Ultimate Band Saw Box Book
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Good advise however there is always an exception to every rule. LOL
I had probably counted the teeth on more than a few blades 10 years before having an accident and some times will nick my self just handling a freshly sharpened blade.
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RonB wrote:

Is the SawStop's safety mechanism is still active when the saw is shut off and the blade is coasting to a stop?
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Yes, I asked the inventor that several years ago. That's the scenario that I was in when I got cut.
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"Leon" wrote in message

wood.
Unfortunately, I can do one better for a "table saw accident" when not cutting wood. I "filleted" a thumb, to the tune of 13 stitches, on a TS with the blade off and not even plugged in!
Always endeavoring to be safety conscious, and taking advantage of all opportunities to further that goal, I was installing an overhead blade guard, and, in the process, created a perfectly functioning guillotine.
The E-room logged me in as a "table saw accident" ... though I doubt that I skewed the statistic by much.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 6/1/07
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It's getting pretty bad then the safety device is the part of the saw that gets you. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote in message

Pretty much my usual run of luck ... if you haven't noticed. :)
--
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Last update: 6/1/07
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