Is 5HP CS overkill for hobbyist?

A DAGS indicates this subject has not been discussed recently, and I would like to request current thinking.
I am about to pull the trigger on a General 650 CS, which will find its home in my garage shop. I am faced with the option of paying less than $200 more (plus additional wiring costs) for a 5HP motor over the 3HP version.
I am most certainly a hobbyist (and a fairly new one at that), but I would like this purchase to be the last in the category.
Thoughts/recommendations?
(Gratuitous jockstrap-size like claims already assumed <g>).
/rick
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Yes it's probably overkill. If you are a beginner, there is nothing wrong with getting a nice precision piece of equipment (I hae a 3HP Unisaw, and nhave never needed even more power). A sugestion though. After doing this for a long time, I had the tablesaw, and then, years later, got the MiniMax 16 bandsaw. If I had to do it again, I would get, in this order:
Bandaw, Jointer and Planer, radial arm or chop saw, then a tablesaw.
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i just purchased the general 650 with a 5HP motor - no regrets. for the price difference, i don't know why you wouldn't do it.
one warning -- if you get the left tilt model, and plan on getting an excalibur sliding table, know that you won't be able to open the motor cover with the table installed.
good luck.
--- dz
RickS wrote:

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3 hp is way PLENTY..... unless you are in a production setting, running the saw 8 hours a day with a power feeder.
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A 283 in an old MG is pushin' things a bit. Adding a blower or an NO2 set up is ...
Spend the extra bucks on a few really good saw blades and/or some finger boards/ push stick and maybe some wood.
charlie b
(I still don't know why you can buy a car that'll do 200+ mph when the max speed limit is about 1/3rd that speed. Maybe being able to actually see your gas gauge drop as you drive?)
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Ya means ya never had yer MG over 180 MP freakin' H yet? Ya doh know whature missin' mister! Yeeeeee Haaaaaawwww.
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I personally would get the 5 HP model. Even if you never use the full capacity of the saw the more power is better. Think about this with the 5 HP you are not running the motor as close to peak output as if you were a 3HP at any time thus reducing overall stress and wear on the motor and in turn the larger motor should last longer. It is like the difference between a V6 pulling a trailor and a V8. They can both do it but which reeives more wear and tear. Less stress = longer life. The harder you work something the shorter the lifespan in general. But if short term economics are a factor go with the 3 HP model.
CHRIS
"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

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HP
V6
wear
go
With all due respect, I resaw 5.5" wide Ipe, an iron wood, with the blade all the way up. With 3hp I don't ever hear a change in speed as I make the complete cut. 1.5 to 2 hp is plenty, 3hp is bordering on over kill. I never use the full capacity of the motor.
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"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

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Don't really understand the obsession with power. I run a professional 12" Wadkin with a 3 HP, I normally cut 8/4 hard maple, but occasionally rip 12/4 teak, all no problem. It has been suggested that if were ripping 8 hours a day with a stock feeder the 5HP might be beneficial, maybe, but if I had that need I'd be doing it on a bandsaw. I do know that the 12" 3 HP Wadkins were the main workhorse in UK shops for years, I don't think they even offered a 5 HP and don't forget these machines were designed when carbide blades were as rare as hens teeth.
Bernard R
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12"
12/4
a
Wadkins
It is a little known fact that back in the day, carbide blades were MADE out of hens teeth. Thus the scarcity of both.
Jack
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"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

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Many of use a 1.5 HP with no problems so 3 HP would be a dream. Can't think if a single reason a guy in your position would ever need 5HP. I'd use the difference to buy a router or blades. Unless your hobby is cutting up old railroad ties. Ed
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Not to mention the electrical draw. I've got 200 amp service and I still dim the lights for a moment when my 220V 3HP saw spins up. My wife says when she's in the bedroom and I'm in the shop, she can't hear the saw but she knows when I'm using because the lights flicker. I can't imagine what a 5 HP motor would do. Does it come with soft-start?
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Roy Smith responds:

You'd better get that wiring checked. I ran a 3 horse Unisaw for years without any diminution in lighting, AC or anything else, including a running compressor while the AC units were on. That was on a 200 amp box that was for the shop alone, but the idea holds true. If you have that saw on a separate circuit, and the box isn't overloaded already, there should be no dimming.
Charlie Self "Don't let yesterday use up too much of today." Will Rogers
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message

I just started up my 3 hp Unisaw and saw absolutely no dimming of the lights, and that is on a circuit box that is already at the limit. I have an upgrade planned, but need to know how much I might need when I get A/C installed first.
If a 20amp max load appliance is dimming the lights you have a problem...
When I was looking into saws I found that there is actually quite a kick up in complexity when you go to 5hp. According to the building codes a 5hp saw should be permanently wired rather than on a plug - personally I would ignore this since the risk of chopping your hand off during a blade change is much greater than any risk that might come from that plug (and in any case the saw won't take any more than an electric stove).
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5 HP is way overkill for anyone but a production shop. And they may not need it either.
I have a 3 HP Unisaw and it never bogs down. Ever.
Spend the $200 on something else.
Rob
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My Unisaw has a "less than a horse" motor and so far I haven't had a problem. :-)
UA100
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"RickS" wrote in message

Forego the extra HP and put the money into a good dado set, a top notch blade, or wood for a project. It is highly unlikely that you will ever miss the extra hp in a personal workshop, or even in a "pro" shop for that matter.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/13/04
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Thanks, everyone!
You have all eloquently confirmed my suspicions (and hopes) and made this one of the easier decisions along the route of buying a table saw: 3HP it is.
/rick.
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