Installing (2002) Delta TS

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On 06/08/2016 3:59 PM, -MIKE- wrote: ...

"Fast-acting" ones, yes, "slo-blo" (specifically designed for motor loads and the like with an initial short-lived high-current transient) wouldn't.

...
The fuse had to heat up, too (in fact, it had to actually melt) but the idea is correct; they are designed to handle motor loads inherently to be general-purpose; it would be a real pain to have to have separate breakers for the application.
The time for a dead short to heat up and trip will be quite a lot shorter than that for the motor start; while a motor start is a (relatively) high current (say 3X or so of full load), that of a dead short is I=V/(R-->zero) --> Infinite.
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dpb wrote:

So... you basically agreed with the previous poster...
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On 06/08/2016 5:38 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

Well, yes, I said that in the very beginning that his general ideas were/are correct but added some amplification as to "why" and "what" actually is going on.
Was that needing comment for some reason?
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dpb wrote:

Maybe my fault for having missed that up front. Sorry.
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No, in addition to the thermal detector, circuit breakers have a magnetic trip. A high enough current will trip the circuit before the thermal detector can trip.
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krw wrote:

The OP is satisfied. I just bought a outlet to match the saw's male connector.
There's nothing like an electrical thread to create action around here. Thank you for your willingness to help!
Bill
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wrote:

You done good.

There are a bunch of woodworking EEs. ;-) It seems the two disciplines use some of the same mental skills.
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4ax.com:

Looks like you're on to something. - Sparks flying is a bad thing. - You can glue/solder pieces together, but it's not always a good idea. - You can never have too many clamps/outlets. - Measure twice, cut once applies to electricity too. (Measure, power good, cut off at breaker, measure again, no power, probably safe to work.) - You don't have to match colors to make things work, but not doing so is the sure sign of a clueless hack. (Intentional mismatching is ok.) - Hand planes and wire strippers remove the outer surface of the workpiece. - Copper turns green with age, so do trees. - Running the wood backwards through the saw won't reattach it... Not even if you swap the motor leads. - The sun can be used to generate wood or electricity.
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On 09 Jun 2016 02:58:34 GMT, Puckdropper

;-)
However, there are differences. Wood can be used to make electricity but the other way around takes a *long* time.
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wrote:

You're good to go. Household circuit breakers are pretty much equivalent to "slow blow" fuses.
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20 amp circuit breaker is fine.
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doug_at_milmac_dot snipped-for-privacy@example.com says...

The breaker equivalent of a "slow-blow" fuse is called a "high magnetic" breaker. If your regular breaker is tripping on startup you might want to consider going that route. Personally when I run into tht though I generally just rewire the tool for 220 (if that's an option) and run a dedicated circuit. Most tools seem happier with 220 anyway.
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On Sat, 11 Jun 2016 05:54:24 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Running large stationary tools at 240V is certainly recommended (I think the OP has already gone that way) but there isn't a lot of reason to run dedicated circuits in a home shop. Several tools can share the circuit, since you aren't likely to use them simultaneously. The exception, of course, is a DC.
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