Installing (2002) Delta TS

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In the owner's manual for my (new to me) Delta TS (36-841), it says:
"This circuit should not be less than #12 wire and should be protected with a 20 Amp time lag fuse."
Not being aware of this detail until now, I was just going to use a regular 20-Amp circuit-breaker (I ran #12 wire). Please advise. Thank you!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Correction, I ran #10 wire, for this.

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Bill wrote:

Also when I say "regular", I do mean 240v (2-pole).
Thanks! Bill

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In trying to answer my question, I learned that "all circuit breakers are "time delay" by nature of their design."
So, I guess we'll see what happens...
Progress in the shop is continuing after a delay or two in recent years caused by major events.
Bill
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Congratulations, Bill! I've had my Unisaw (Delta 36-844) for 6 years and have had no problems with #12 Romex (about 15ft from sub-panel) and this (standard?) Siemens breaker:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Siemens-20-Amp-Double-Pole-Type-QP-Circuit-Breaker-Q220U/100074746
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On 2016-06-08 3:07 PM, Bill wrote:

Prepare for a few breaker pops, hope the fuse panel is close to the saw.
--
Froz....

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On 06/08/2016 2:19 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

Nope, he'll be fine (as he discovered in further research and posted) as circuit breaker as opposed to fast-acting fuse has enough inherent lag time for the motor...
--




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FrozenNorth wrote:

Don't know why you'd say that. He's well within the current loads with #12 wire and an 20A breaker.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 15:19:50 -0400, FrozenNorth

Nonsense. My 3HP Unisaur has been on a 20A (240V) circuit, with 20-30' of 12-2 W/G between it and the panel for years, with zero trips. Come to think of it, it was ~50' in my last house.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 15:19:50 -0400, FrozenNorth

If wired for 120 V I would say yes, if wire for 240 V probably not.
Mark
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Markem wrote:

20 amps is 20 amps. Don't matter whether you're running 120 or 240.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 21:30:09 -0400, Mike Marlow

Not true. The motor will draw half the current at 240V, as it would wired for 120V.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 21:30:09 -0400, Mike Marlow

Yes but a 240 V circuit has two 20 amp leads, a motor drawing 20 amps, 10 per leg.
Mark
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On Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 8:55:19 PM UTC-5, Markem wrote:

Current (when there is a load) is the same at any place in the circuit, regardless of being 120 or 240.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 19:48:35 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

Yes, in the circuit external to the motor but not if the motor itself is considered. The voltage across each winding is 120V and the current in each is 10A, whether it's wired as 120V (parallel windings) or 240V (series).
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

However a more that needs 20 amps at 110 volts only needs 10 at 220.
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J. Clarke wrote:

That's because it gets 10 amps on Each of Two legs at the same time (I think "legs" is the right word, I could be wrong).
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On Thursday, June 9, 2016 at 1:45:41 AM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

ays:

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,

, regardless of being 120 or 240.

Even though this is not DC...Ohm's Law says your theory is wrong. I=E/R, if you double the voltage you halve the current. Also, wattage would prove that out. The same motor wired 240, would draw half what it did on 120. On single phase, the neutral (white or ground) is the center-tap of the power transformer. That's why it's half the voltage.
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Bob Villa wrote:

I get it. I'm also gently reminded/informed that a 240V circuit is Not the equivalent of two 120v circuits.
Thanks, Bill

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On 6/9/2016 4:23 PM, Bill wrote:

But you do realize that the 240 in your home is made up of 2 out of phase 120 circuits...
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