Installing 10' ceiling . . ..

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I did a 14 by 18 drywall ceiling by myself using a 2x4 sling six feet from the wall. Use long 5 inch screws and suspend a 2x4 under the ceiling joist about 2 inches. Leaving more than 4 feet between screws. Use another 2x4 to travel from the sling to the wall in the middle of the drywall sheet. Standing on a sturdy workbench lift the drywall and slide it above the 2x4 sling along the 2x4 and hopefully into the space above the drywall on the wall. This takes planning but it is doable. I installed 3 8 foot and 3 ten foot 1/2 inch sheets of drywall this way, single handed in a shop full of tools and lumber.
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Thats creative . . . Thanks Steve
wrote:

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Thanks. Those 3 ten footers almost killed me. :) But if you are fit and your standing bench is a long enough you can do it.

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I'm not in that good of shape . . . . But I must say that is a very creative way of getting the job done . . .

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Exactly what I was going to suggest, but after the argument, I'm staying outta of it!!! I did my basement by myself with 12' 5/8" drywall.
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Thanks I appreciate it . . . Steve

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But was it a ten foot ceiling?<g> Those 2 extra feet are a killer. I'm not sure I could even lift one end of 12' 5/8 drywall.
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Well no, it's only 8 foot, but the whole point is how you and I both did it. And yes, it was a bitch, I hurt for a week, but it had to be done and that's the way I thought of. I was working nights, and everybody I knew that could help worked days, so what are you going to do. And if your thinking why 5/8", it was free. I did my whole basement, ceiling and walls, and gave a bunch of it away. Over estimate or something on a job site I was doing some work at.

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On Mon, 24 Apr 2006 15:20:48 -0500, "Steve DeMars"

Dead men actually about 10' 1" tall and a scaffold (milk crates and 2x10s work great but you might need something abit taller).
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Thanks
I'm really leaning toward the drywall lift . . . I have a short time span before I return to work . . . storms are popping up everywhere & I'm an adjuster . . .
Thanks, Steve
wrote:

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As those below have said... lift is best, if available. T-shaped sticks, of whatever name, work too. To help with the T-shaped sticks, use a cleat at the "end you're not at." A 1 x 3, screwed to the support/joist at the edge of the last panel, but flush with the lower surface of that panel. Makes a little 1/2" pocket for the next sheet to go in. Slide the edge of the new sheet in the pocket, then, while keeping some pressure to keep it seated, walk underneath it, pushing it up and then introducing the T-stick to hold up the loose end. Once that's up and wedged in, you can tap the edges with a block and hammer to line things up, add another T-stick if needed to reduce bowing, and fasten away. The two or three screws holding the cleat in either dig dents for themselves, or provide 1/8" spacing between panels, which ever you prefer.
The cleat serves to keep things relatively steady while wedging the T-sticks, rather than having two spindly, wobbly things holding up a sheet that's swaying dangerously because it's not tight against the ceiling yet. Been there, done that, got the t-shrit.
ASCII drawing attempt:
========|__ ====old sheet pocket new sheet
Bet that'll look good...
When doing things like this, alone, I usually pre-dial 911 and put my phone where I'll fall on the "send" button...
"Chip"

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Thanks . . . as to the 1/8" spacing . . so far on my walls I have not been spacing . . . my therory is that since the shop is not climate controlled yet . . . with the high humidity as a norm here in Louisiana, I am assuming when I A/C the shop, remove moisture, I will start seeing a gap anyway . . . any thoughts on that . . .
Steve

drive
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Why not just use drywall on the ceiling? I can see some durability benefits using ply on the walls, but not the ceiling. Is drywall still hard to come by down there?
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It is actually more expensive than Luan . . . . Have thought of doing it, but I think my luck may be better handling Luan. Not worried about the lights, I'm using electronic ballast (no heat). If I were using magnetic ballast, I would have to go with drywall or fir out with it . . .
I am still trying to get a price from a guy to install drywall . . . I think drywall would help with the sound also . . .
Thanks Steve

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.
benefits
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Steve DeMars wrote:

Well, I'm in BR, and I've got some free time. My folks live on the Northshore. That's only 11 sheets--should take no time at all. Send me an email if you like--remove the obvious.
-Phil Crow
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Steve:
First, let me say thanks for using our screws! (Whether you call them Square Drive, Robertson, or ScruLox - as they were called by the original inventor's company in Canada until several years ago!) You may wish to rethink your ceiling from a safety stadpoint. Putting wood on the wall and ceiling of a shop sounds like a great idea at first, but it creates a tinderbox from a fire safety standpoint. A better approach is to install drywall for the ceiling, then panel over it with the luan. I will be doing that very thing in my own new shop very soon (but first I need to make a set of kitchen cabinets).
HTH, Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws www.mcfeelys.com
Shop size 20' X 22' with 10' ceiling height.<BR>&gt; Need suggestions how to get 1/2" Luan up there by myself . . .<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; All my walls are 1/2" Luan . .&nbsp; Attached with 1-1/4" McFeely square drive<BR>&gt; screws . . . Plan to use 2" on the ceiling . . .<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Getting help or hiring help is not an option . . . Everyone in this area<BR>&gt; that can swing a hammer is working on new construction or rebuilding New<BR>&gt; Orleans . . .<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Thanks in advance,<BR>&gt; Steve<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
------=
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jimbo wrote:

[snip]
Jim, We appreciate your participation in our group. Keep it up. Oh, and I will shamelessly admit to being one of your satisfied customers.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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