INSPIRATION - Router Bit Case


http://www.gunshop.com/doubleguncases/dgcase_snapcaps_case_030901.jpg
These are NOT router bits. But, if you want a case for them, this is the best looking type I've seen yet.
JOAT A rolling stone gathers no moss...unless it's a hobby he does on the weekends.
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Looks more like 10, 12, 16, 28, and 410 gauge. But kinda short I think.
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Snap caps.
But rather fance ones, for fancy shotguns, I suppose...
Kevin
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Fri, Dec 9, 2005, 1:59am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com (KevinCraig) explains: Snap caps. But rather fance ones, for fancy shotguns, I suppose...
Yep, that's what they are. Fancy indeed. For a matched set of British double shotguns. Can you imagaine how much a matched set of Purdys, or similar, would cost? Ran across them on a site listing cased double, "expensive" cased doubles, in fact, VERY expensive cased doubles. They didn't say, but I wouldn't be surprised if the snap caps were handmade also.
JOAT A rolling stone gathers no moss...unless it's a hobby he does on the weekends.
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Leon> Snap caps.

To protect the firing pin? or the end of the barrel?
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The former. Snap caps go in the chamber in place of a shell or cartridge. They usually have a small spring under a brass cap where the primer would be in a normal cartridge. That way the firing pin will strike a point that "gives" when struck, while still providing enough resistance so that the rear of the firing pin does not contact the rear of the frame, possibly causing damage to one or the other. With many of the fine old English guns the hammer spring is actually rather weak and can take a "set" if the weapon is left cocked while in storage. To avoid this the trigger is pulled to release the spring tension prior to putting the gun away.
As to cost, depending on grade and condition, a 5 gauge set of matched Purdeys could be worth as much as a medium sized house in Dallas (say 150K), at the low end, only as much as a good truck.
I have a Purdey (standard grade 12 gauge (2 1/2" shells)) that belonged to my father, picked up in London during WWII, that I have been offered a bunch of bucks for. It is truly a work of art even in standard grade.
Regards.
On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 14:44:55 GMT, "Leon"

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Kind of limiting ain't it. Them router bits breed like rabbits. If you don't keep them separated you'll be up to your ass in them within a month.
I'm working on keeping mine on separate shelves, in a closed wall cabinet so they don't sneak off and copulate under the router table or in my wood stach.
Haven't got the knife hinges installed right yet but I'm hoping too before the router bit population fills the shop
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/CooperedDoors/CooperedDoors0.html
charlie b
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